Working with (custom) requirements for Win32 apps

A few months ago I did a post about Working with the restart behavior of Win32 apps and a few months before that I did a post about Working with Win32 app dependencies. This week is similar to those post. This week is also about Win32 apps, but this week it’s about working with requirements for Win32 apps. Requirements can be used to make sure that the Win32 app will only install on a device that meets specific requirements. That means that requirements for Win32 apps, bring a lot of options and capabilities, which enable a lot of scenarios. Think about deploying a Win32 app to a user group and only installing on a specific device brand, type, or model. That can be achieved by using requirements. In this post I’ll quickly go through the different standard available requirement types, followed by a more detailed look at the custom script requirement type. I’ll end this post by looking at the administrator experience on a Windows device.

Requirement type

Now let’s start by having a look at the standard available requirement types within Microsoft Intune. Let’s do that by first navigating to the location in the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center portal that provides the different requirement options for Win32 apps.

  1. Open the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center portal and navigate to Apps Windows > Windows apps to open the Windows – Windows apps blade
  2. On the Windows – Windows apps blade, select a Win32 app (or create a new one) and click Properties > Requirements to open the Requirements blade

On the Requirements blade, the different standard available Win32 app requirement types are shown. Those requirement types are shown and explained below.

  1. Operating system architecture: This requirement enables the administrator to select the required architecture (32-bit | 64-bit) of the operating system that is needed for the Win32 app. This is a required configuration.
  2. Minimum operating system: This requirement enables the administrator to select the minimum operating system version that is needed to install the Win32 app. This is a required configuration.
  3. Disk space required (MB): This requirement enables the administrator to configure the free disk space that is needed on the system drive to install the Win32 app. This is an optional requirement.
  4. Physical memory required (MB): This requirement enables the administrator to configure the physical memory (RAM) that is required to install the Win32 app. This is an optional requirement.
  5. Minimum number of logical processors required: This requirement enables the administrator to configure the minimum number of logical processors that are required to install the Win32 app. This is an optional requirement.
  6. Minimum CPU speed required (MHz): This requirement enables the administrator to configure the minimum CPU speed that is required to install the Win32 app. This is an optional requirement.
  7. Configure additional requirement rules: See below.

The six requirements mentioned above are the standard available and easy to configure Win32 app requirement types. Besides those requirements, it’s also possible to add more advanced requirement types (as shown with number 7 above). The first requirement in that list of more advanced requirement types is File. That requirement type enables the administrator to create requirement rule that must detect a file or folder, date, version, or size. A requirement rule of that type requires the following configuration properties.

  • Path – This property enables the administrator to configure the full path of the folder that contains the file or folder that should be detected.
  • File or folder – This property enables the administrator to configure the file or folder that should be detected.
  • Property – This property enables the administrator to configure the type of rule that should be used to validate the presence of the Win32 app. The following self explaining options are available.
    • File or folder exists
    • File or folder does not exist
    • Date modified
    • Date created
    • String (version)
    • Size in MB
  • Associated with a 32-bit app on 64-bit clients – This property enables the administrator to configure that path environment variables are in 32-bit (yes) or 64-bit (no) context on 64-bit clients.

The second requirement in that list of more advanced requirement types is Registry. That requirement type enables the administrator to create requirement rule that must detect a registry setting based on value, string, integer, or version. A requirement rule of that type requires the following configuration properties.

  • Key path – This property enables the administrator to configure the full path of the registry entry containing the value that should be detected.
  • Value name – This property enables the administrator to configure the name of the registry value that should be detected. When this property is empty, the detection will happen on the default value. The default value will also be used as detection value if the detection method is other than file or folder existence.
  • Registry key requirement – This property enables the administrator to configure the type of registry key comparison that should be used to determine how the requirement rule is validated. The following self explaining options are available.
    • Key exists
    • Key does not exist
    • String comparison
    • Version comparison
    • integer comparison
  • Associated with a 32-bit app on 64-bit clients –This property enables the administrator to configure that the search is in the 32-bit registry (yes) or in the 64-bit registry (no) on 64-bit clients.

The third requirement in that list of more advanced requirement types is Script. That is the most advanced requirement type. That requirement type enables the administrator to create requirement rules that can check on basically anything that can be scripted, as long as the script has the correct output. A requirement rule of that type requires the following configuration properties.

  • Script name – This property enables the administrator to provide a name for the script.
  • Script file – This property enables the administrator to select a script that will be used to verify custom requirements. When the script exit code is 0, Intune will detect the STDOUT in more detail.
  • Run script as 32-bit process on 64-bit clients – This property enables the administrator to configure the script to run in a 32-bit process (yes) or in a 64-bit process (no) on 64-bit clients.
  • Run this script using the logged on credentials – This property enables the administrator to configure the script to run using the credentials of the signed in user (yes) or using the SYSTEM context (no).
  • Enforce script signature check – This property enables the administrator to configure that the script signature should be verified (yes) or that the signature verification should be skipped (no).
  • Select output data type – This property enables the administrator to configure the data type that is used to determine a requirement rule match. The following self explaining options are available.
    • String
    • Date and Time
    • Integer
    • Floating Point
    • Version
    • Boolean

This advanced requirement type enables an administrator to check on basically anything. Based on the information provided above, the script should run successful (exit code 0) and provide an output in the selected data type (string, date and time, integer, floating point, version or boolean).

Administrator experience

Let’s end this post by having a look at the behavior of requirement rules a on a Windows 10 device. To do that I’ve used a really simple script that will check the manufacturer of the device. When the manufacturer matches the specified manufacturer, the script will output “Found it!“. That means that the requirement rule should look for output data of the type String. And more specifically a String that equals “Found it!“.

if ((Get-WmiObject Win32_ComputerSystem).Manufacturer -eq "Microsoft Corporation") {
    Write-Output "Found it!" 
}

When adding this script as a requirement rule to a Win32 app and deploying that app as a required app to a user or a device, the installation process can be followed very good in the IntuneManagedExtension.log. That includes the process of verifying the requirement rules that should be checked. Below is that example. It walks through the process of checking the requirement rules for the Win32 app. It shows the start of the script, the result of the script and following the applicability of the Win32 app (based on the result of the requirement rule).

More information

For more information about the Win32 app functionality in Microsoft Intune, refer to the documentation about Intune Standalone – Win32 app management.

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