The different ways of (re)naming Windows 10 devices

This week is all about Windows 10 devices. More specifically about (re)naming Windows 10 devices. And all that by using standard available functionality without custom scripting. This post will bring different posts together that I did over the last couple of years and will introduce one new configuration option that was recently introduced within Windows Autopilot. In this post I’ll go through the different (configuration) options for (re)naming Windows 10 devices.

Configuration options

Now let’s dive into the different configuration options. All of these configuration options are from a MDM-Intune-Autopilot perspective. Scripting a device rename action could also be scripted by using PowerShell, but for this post I want to rely on built-in functionality.

Custom device configuration profile

The first configuration option that I want to mention is the configuration that is available on every Windows 10 device, as it relies on Windows 10 MDM. This configuration relies on a custom device configuration profile, as shortly explained below. The actual behavior is similar to what will happen when selecting a device and clicking Restart.

When creating a custom device configuration profile, provide at least the following information on the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade.

  • Name: Provide a valid name;
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a description
  • OMA-URI: ./Device/Vendor/MSFT/Accounts/Domain/ComputerName
  • Data type: Select String
  • Value: CLDCLN%SERIAL% (or use the other example of CLDCLN%RAND:6%)

For more information about the custom device configuration option, please have a look at my blog post specifically about this subject.

Domain join device configuration profile

The second configuration option that I want to mention is the configuration that is only available for Windows Autopilot deployments that require a hybrid Azure AD join. In that case a domain join device configuration profile should be used to configure the name of the Windows 10 device. Below is a short explanation.

When creating a custom device configuration profile, provide at least the following information on the Domain Join (Preview) blade.
  • Computer name prefix: Provide a computer name prefix. The remaining characters of the 15 characters of a computer name will be random
  • Domain name: Provide the domain name that the device will join
  • Organizational unit: (Optional) Provide the OU that the computer account is created in

For more information about the domain join device configuration option, please have a look at my blog post specifically about this subject.

Windows Autopilot deployment profile

The third configuration option that I want to mention is the configuration that is only available for Windows Autopilot deployments that require Azure AD join. In that case the Windows Autopilot deployment profile should be used to configure the name of the Windows 10 device. Below is a short explanation.

When creating a Windows Autopilot deployment, provide at least the following information on the Create profile blade, on the Out-of-box experience (OOBE) section.

  • Deployment mode: Select User-Driven, or Self-Deploying, as both option can be used in combination with applying a computer name template
  • Join to Azure AD as: Select Azure AD joined to join the device to Azure AD during the Windows Autopilot user-driven experience
  • (When applicable) End user license agreement (EULA): Select Hide to hide the EULA during the Windows Autopilot user-driven experience
  • (When applicable) Privacy Settings: Select Hide to the hide the privacy settings during the Windows Autopilot user-driven experience
  • (When applicable) Hide change account options: Select Hide to hide the change account options during the Windows Autopilot user-driven experience
  • User account type: Select Administrator to only make any user on the device an administrative user
  • (When applicable) Language (Region): Select the applicable language and configure the keyboard
  • (When applicable) Allow White Glove OOBE: Select Yes, when using in combination with White Glove
  • Apply computer name template: Create a computer name, according to the configured template, for devices at initial startup

For more information about the Windows Autopilot deployment profile option, please have a look at my blog post specifically about this subject. This is just one example about Windows Autopilot on my blog that contains this configuration option.

Windows Autopilot device property

The fourth configuration option that I want to mention is the configuration that is only available for Windows Autopilot deployments that require Azure AD join. In this case it’s a property of the Windows Autopilot device that can be used for configuring the configuring the device. The device name will only be configured during the Windows Autopilot deployment. Below are the steps for configuring the device name for Windows Autopilot devices.

After adding a device to Windows Autopilot the following steps help with adjusting the device name.

  • Open the Microsoft 365 Device Management portal and navigate to Devices Windows > Windows enrollment > Devices to open the Windows Autopilot devices blade
  • On the Windows Autopilot devices blade, select the applicable device to open the Properties blade
  • On the Properties blade, provide a custom name with Device Name and click Save.

This can also be automated via the WindowsAutopilotIntune module.

Note: It’s possible to configure the device name for all devices, but are ignored with Hybrid Azure AD joined deployment.

More information

For more information about the different device (re)name options, please refer to the following articles:

Report-only mode for conditional access

This week is, like last week, about a awareness for new feature that is introduced with conditional access. Last week was all about the recently introduced Conditional Access Insights workbook. In that post I already mentioned the Report-only mode for conditional access policies. In this post I want to focus on that Report-only mode. Report-only mode is a new state of a conditional access policy state that allows IT administrators to evaluate the impact of conditional access policies before enabling them in their environment. That enables the IT administrators to anticipate on the number and names of users impacted by common deployment initiatives such as blocking legacy authentication, requiring multi-factor authentication, or implementing sign-in risk policies. A great step forward.

In this post I’ll walk through the steps of configuring Report-only mode for conditional access policies, followed by looking at the end-user experience. I’ll end this post by looking at the administrator experience.

Configure report-only mode

Let’s start by having a look at the steps to configure the Report-only mode for a conditional access policy. These steps will walk through the creation of a new conditional access policy, with a focus on configuring the Report-only mode. The exact configuration of the conditional access policy assignments and conditions are not part of that focus. The following three steps walk through that configuration.

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to Azure Active Directory  > Security > Conditional access (or open the Microsoft 365 Device Management portal and navigate to Endpoint security Conditional access) to open the Conditional access – Policies blade
  2. On the Conditional access – Policies blade, click New policy to open the New blade
  3. On the New blade, configure the assignment and conditions to filter the users and cloud apps that should be targeted by the conditional access policy. After configuring the conditions it’s time to look at the access controls. The access controls are the configuration that eventually might impact the end-user. In the access controls, the grant control determines that behavior. In the grant control the IT administrator can configure the requirements that should be met for accessing the cloud app for the end-user. Depending on the configured requirements, there might be a minimal impact for the end-user (see Figure 1 and and Figure 2 about the messages that are shown about the impact of the conditional access policy based on the configured requirements). After configuring the grant control, select Report-only with Enable policy (also shown in Figure 1) and click Create.

End-user experience

Depending on the configuration that is used in the grant control, of the conditional access policy, the end-user might have a slight impact when using the Report-only mode. The table below is a summary of the available requirements in combination with the potential impact. This table is based on the information as shown during the configuration of the conditional access (see Figure 2), as I haven’t been able to get the mentioned experience on my test devices. I’ve tested with a Samsung Galaxy 10, iPad 2018 and iPhone X.

RequirementPotential user impact
Require multi-factor authentication No impact
Require device to be marked as compliantMay prompt users on macOS, iOS and Android devices to select a device certificate
Require Hybrid Azure AD joined device No impact
Require approved client appMay prompt users on macOS, iOS and Android devices to select a device certificate
Require app protection policyMay prompt users on macOS, iOS and Android devices to select a device certificate

Administrator experience

An interesting part to look at is the experience of the IT administrator. That can be achieved by looking at the Conditional Access Insights workbook (as shown last week). The Conditional Access Insights workbook can be used to get the insights of the different Report-only mode conditional access policies. The data in the workbook can be filtered to only show information about Report-only mode conditional access policies, or even only data of a specific conditional access policy.

Besides that workbook, the Sign-ins monitoring of Azure AD also provides a new tab in the details of a sign-in. That tab is the Report-only (Preview) tab. As shown below that tab provides information about the different Report-only mode conditional access policies that were applicable to the sign-in. Per conditional access policy, the result is shown of the sign-in. That result will show what the effect would be of that conditional access policy and that information will help with determining the impact of enabling that conditional access policy.

Below is an overview of the different result states of a Report-only conditional access policy. Almost all of these results are shown in Figure 3 above (with the exception of the user action required result).

ResultExplanation
Report only: FailureThe configured conditional access policy conditions were satisfied, but not all the required (non-interactive) controls were satisfied.
Report only: SuccessThe configured conditional access policy conditions and required (non-interactive) controls were satisfied. 
Report only: Not appliedNot all configured conditional access policy conditions were satisfied.
Report only: User action requiredThe configured conditional policy conditions were satisfied, but a user action would be required to satisfy the required controls.

More information

For more information regarding report-only, please refer to the following documents:

Conditional Access Insights

This week is all about creating awareness for the Conditional Access Insights workbook. This workbook is currently still in preview and is using Azure Monitor workbook functionality. The Conditional Access Insights workbook contains sign-in log queries that can help IT administrators with getting insights on the impact of conditional access policies. That is useful for troubleshooting, for following trends and for testing the latest introduction to conditional access of Report-only policies. Especially the latest category can be easily verified by using the Conditional Access Insights workbook. In this post I’ll walk trough the steps of creating a Log Analytics workspace (to store Azure Monitor log data), followed by the steps to send Azure AD sign-in information to Azure Monitor logs.I’ll end this post by actually looking at the Conditional Access Insights workbook.

Create a Log Analytics workspace

The first step to prepare for using the Conditional Access Insights workbook, is to create a Log Analytics workspace. A Log Analytics workspace is a unique environment for Azure Monitor log data. Each Log Analytics workspace has its own data repository and configuration, and data sources and solutions are configured to store their data in a particular workspace. To create a Log Analytics workspace simply follow the 2 steps below.

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to  All services  > Log Analytics workspaces to open the Log Analytics workspaces blade
  2. On the Log Analytics workspaces blade, provide the following information and click OK
  • Select Create New
  • Log Analytics Workspace: Provide a unique name for the Log Analytics workspace
  • Subscription: Select a valid subscription for the Log Analytics workspace
  • Resources group: Select an existing resource group for the Log Analytics workspace, or click Create new to create a new resource group for the Log Analytics workspace
  • Location: Select a location for the Log Analytics workspace
  • Pricing tier: Select a pricing tier for the Log Analytics workspace

Note: Alternatively the Log Analytics workspace can be created during the process of configuring the diagnostic settings of Azure AD.

Send logs to Azure Monitor logs

The second step to prepare for using the Conditional Access Insights workbook, is to send the Azure AD sign-in logs to Azure Monitor logs (previously known as Log Analytics). Azure Monitor logs allows the administrator to query data to find particular events, analyze trends, and perform correlation across various data sources. To send the Azure AD sign-in logs to Azure Monitor logs simply follow the 3 steps below.  

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to  Azure Active Directory  > Diagnostic settings to open the [Azure AD] > Diagnostic settings blade
  2. On the [Azure AD] > Diagnostic settings blade, click Add diagnostic settings to open the Diagnostic settings blade
  3. On the Diagnostic settings blade, provide the following information and click Save
  • Name: Provide a unique name for the diagnostic settings configuration
  • Select Send to Log Analytics
  • Subscription: Select a valid subscription for the Azure Monitor logs
  • Log Analytics Workspace: Select the previously created Log Analytics workspace as a location to store the Azure Monitor logs
  • Log: Select SignInLog

Conditional Access Insights workbook

After making sure that the Azure AD sign-in information is send to Azure Monitor logs, the Conditional Access Insights workbook can be used to get insights in the log data. This workbook contains sign-in log queries that can help IT administrators monitor the impact of conditional access policies. This provides the IT administrators with the ability to report on how many users would have been granted or denied access. This workbook contains details per condition so that the impact of a policy can be contextualized per condition. The following steps walk through navigating to and through the Conditional Access Insights workbook.

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to  Azure Active Directory  > Workbooks to open the [Azure AD] > Workbooks blade

Tip: Also make sure to take a look at the other available workbooks, as those workbooks provide a lot of insights about the different sign-ins. Really useful for insights.

  1. On the [Azure AD] > Workbooks blade, click Conditional Access Insights (Preview) to open the Conditional Access Insights (Preview) workbook

The Conditional Access Insights workbook provides the IT administrator with a lot of insights based on the Azure AD sign-in information. The figures above show the following information:

  • Figure 4 shows the parameter selection and the Impact summary section of the workbook. The parameter selection section provides five parameters to filter the insights of the workbook: Conditional Access Policy, Time Range, User, Apps and Data View. The first filter can also be used to easily verify the impact of the recently Report-only conditional access policies, as the insights can be filtered to a specific conditional access policy. The Impact summary section, shows a quick overview of the results for the selected conditional access policy in the specified time range. Clicking on the different tiles will further filter the breakdown sections.
  • Figure 5 and 6 show the Breakdown per condition and sign-in status section of the workbook. The Breakdown per condition and sign-in status section shows the impact of the selected conditional access policies broken down by each of six conditions: Device state, Device platform, Client apps, Sign-in risk, Location and Applications. Clicking on the logs sign with a breakdown, will open the used query in the logs viewer. That will provide the kql-query that is used to filter the right information.
  • Figure 7 shows the Sign-in details section of the workbook. The Sign-in details section enables the IT administrator to investigate individual sign-ins, filtered by the parameters selected in the workbook. Search for individual users, sorted by sign-in frequency, and view their corresponding sign-in events.

More information

For more information regarding conditional access insights, refer to the following documents:

Working with the restart behavior of Win32 apps

A long time ago, I did a post about Working with the restart behavior of Applications in ConfigMgr 2012. That post is still being read pretty well. Based on the interest of that post, and the introduction of nice new features to the Win32 apps, I thought it would be a good idea to redo that post for Microsoft Intune. Before an IT administrator had to be creative to work with, or work around, the restart behavior of Win32 apps. Either by wrapping installations and capturing the exit code, or by tuning the translation of an return code. With the latest adjustments to the Win32 apps, within Microsoft Intune, the IT administrator has more options to actually work with the return code of an Win32 app installation. These configuration options are similar to the configuration options within the app model of ConfigMgr. In this post I’ll discuss the 2 layers that together define the restart behavior after the installation of Win32 apps.

Return codes

When looking at the restart behavior after the installation of Win32 apps, the first thing that should be looked at is the return code after the installation. By default, when adding a Win32 app to Microsoft Intune, a list of standard return codes is added to indicate post-installation behavior (see figure below). These are often used return codes. When the Win32 app installation ends with a different return code, additional entries can be added. This configuration is available via [Win32 app] > Properties > Return codes.

Fore every return code a code type can be configured. The code configures the post-installation behavior of the Win32 app. The following code types are available and can be configured with the return code to apply the mentioned behavior:

  • Failed – The Failed return code indicates that the Win32 app installation failed.
  • Hard reboot – The Hard reboot return code indicates that the device is required to restart to complete the installation. Additional Win32 apps cannot be installed on the device without restart. The user will be notified about the required restart.
  • Soft reboot – The Soft reboot return code indicates that the next Win32 app is allowed to be installed without requiring a restart, but a restart is necessary to complete the installation of the installed Win32 app. The user will be notified about the restart.
  • Retry – The Retry return code indicates that the Win32 app installation is retried three times. The installation will wait for 5 minutes between each attempt.
  • Success – The Success return code indicates the Win32 app installation was successful.

Enforce device restart behavior

The second thing that should be looked at is how the device will react on the configured return code. By default, when adding a Win32 app to Microsoft Intune, the default device restart behavior is set to App install may force a device restart (see figure below). This configuration will make sure that the device will restart after the Win32 app installation, if needed, but still in an acceptable manner. The restart behavior can be configured to respond to return code differently. That configuration is available via [Win32 app] > Properties > Program.

Multiple device restart behavior configurations are available. And all these configuration options have their own effect on the return code of the Win32 app installation. The following device restart behaviors are available and can be configured to apply the mentioned behavior (including a short explanation about the expected behavior):

  • Determine behavior based on return codes: This option means that the device will restart based on the configured return code. With this configuration a Hard reboot return code will immediately trigger a restart of the device and a Soft reboot return code will notify the user that a restart is required to finish the installation.
  • No specific action: This option means that the installation will suppress device restarts during the Win32 app installation of MSI-based apps. Effectively that means that parameters are added to the installation command line of MSI-based apps to suppress device restart. With this configuration a Hard reboot return code will notify the user that a restart of the device will be triggered in 120 minutes and a Soft reboot return code will notify the user that a restart is required to finish the installation.
  • App install may force a device restart: This option means that the Win32 app installation is allowed to complete without suppressing restarts. With this configuration a Hard reboot return code will notify the user that a restart of the device will be triggered in 120 minutes and a Soft reboot return code will notify the user that a restart is required to finish the installation.
  • Intune will force a mandatory device restart: This option means that a successful Win32 app installation will always restart the device. With this configuration any successful return code will immediately trigger a restart of the device.

More information

For more information about the Win32 app functionality in Microsoft Intune, refer to the documentation about Intune Standalone – Win32 app management.

Applicability rules for device configuration profiles

This week a new blog post about a little nice, but quite unknown, feature. Applicability rules for device configuration profiles. The nice thing about applicability rules is that those rules can be used to target devices in a group that meet specific criteria. That enables an administrator to assign a device configuration profile to all users, or all Windows 10 devices, but only actually apply to Windows 10 devices of a specific version or edition. In this post I’ll go through the configuration of applicability rules (including a few important details) and the administrator experience.

Configure applicability rule

Let’s start by looking at applicability rules. Applicability rules can be configured for every device configuration profile type with Windows 10 and later as Platform, with the exception of Administrative Templates as Profile Type. It enables the administrator to only assign the device configuration profile to a specific version or edition of Windows 10.

Before looking at the configuration of applicability rules, it’s good to be familiar with a few important notes about assigning a device configuration profile including applicability rules. When assigning such a device configuration profile, keep the following in mind:

  • When two device configuration profiles are assigned with the exact same settings, and only one of those profiles has an applicability rule configured, then the profile without an applicability rule is applied.
  • When assigning device configuration profiles to groups, the applicability rules act as a filter, and only target the devices that meet the specified criteria.

Now let’s have a look at the actual configuration of applicability rules. The following steps walk through the configuration of applicability rules in device configuration profiles for Windows 10 devices.

  1. Open the Microsoft 365 Device Management portal and navigate to Devices > Windows Configuration profiles to open the Windows – Configuration profiles blade
  2. Select an existing device configuration profile, or create a new device configuration profile and navigate to Applicability Rules to open the Applicability Rules blade
  3. On the Applicability Rules blade, configure a rule click Add to add the rule and click Save
  • The Rule selection enables the administrator to either use Assign profile if – that will include users or groups that meet the specified criteria – or use Don’t assign profile if – that will exclude users or groups that meet the specified criteria –.
  • The Property selection enables the administrator to either use OS edition – that will enable a list to check the Windows 10 editions that must be included – or use OS version – that will enable fields to enter the min and max Windows 10 version numbers that must be included –. Both values (min and max) are required.

Administrator experience

Let’s end this post by shortly mentioning the administrator experience. The experience is not that exiting actually. When an applicability rule is applicable to a device, the device is targeted with the configuration profile. The device will try to assign the configuration profile and simply show the normal Succeeded, Error or Failed status. When an applicability rule is not applicable to a device, the device wil not be targeted with the configuration profile and the configuration profile will get the status of Not applicable.

More information

For more information regarding applicability rules for device configuration profiles, refer to the Applicability rules section of the Create a device profile in Microsoft Intune doc.

Conditional access and ipadOS

Update: Azure AD has taken a change in how they recognize the browsers so conditional access will now work as expected when creating an iPad conditional access policy and browsing to the modern desktop-class browsing experience on iPadOS. For more information see this article.

Maybe a little overdue, but this week is all about ipadOS in combination with conditional access. At the end of September, Apple released ipadOS. A new platform for iPad. One of the ideas behind ipadOS is to provide “desktop-class browsing with Safari”. That desktop-class browsing is achieved by making sure that the Safari browser on ipadOS will present itself as a Safari browser on macOS. That change introduces a few challenges in combination with conditional access. I know that a lot has been written about this subject already, but looking at the amount of information on my blog about conditional access, and the number of questions I still receive about this subject, I just had to write about this subject. In this post I’ll describe the behavior of ipadOS with conditional access and the challenges that the behavior brings.

The behavior

The first thing is to identify the behavior. The best and easiest place to look for the behavior is the Safari browser itself. Open the Safari browser and browse to a location that is blocked via conditional access. Click on More details and the Device platform will show macOS as the platform (as shown on the top right).

Another method, from an administrator perspective, is by using the Monitoring > Sign-ins section of Azure Active Directory. That section logs the sign-in status. That information also includes device information of the device that is used for the sign-in. On the bottom right is an example of the information that is shown for devices that are running ipadOS and using the Safari browser. It will be recognized as a device running macOS and using the Safari browser.

So far I’ve only mentioned this behavior for the Safari browser on ipadOS. However, there is more. More components that are behaving in a similar way to provide a desktop-class experience. The complete list of affected components on ipadOS is the following:

  • the Safari browser
  • the Native mail app
  • anything that uses Safari View Controllers

Besides that it’s also good to mention that everything else is not affected by this adjustment. So, all Microsoft apps still work as expected, all other browser still work as expected and basically all other apps (with the Intune SDK integrated, or wrapped) still work as expected.

The challenges

Now let’s have a look at the challenges that this behavior brings. Those challenges can be categorized in two main categories, 1) managed apps and 2) differentiating between platforms. This first category contains a flow that actually breaks and the second category contains a flow that needs some more attention. Let’s discuss those challenges in a bit more detail.

Category 1: Managed apps

When looking at the first category, we can simply state that we’re limited in options when we want to require a managed app by either using the Require approved client app or the Require app protection policy control. At this moment these controls only work for Android and iOS. That means that we cannot (easily) force a user to use a managed app on ipadOS. Before we could provide a clear message to a user that a managed app must be used, when trying to connect to a cloud app with the Native mail app or the Safari browser.

This is the point were we have to get creative. It’s possible to look at a technical solution by blocking the Native mail app and the Safari browser when accessing the different cloud apps. However, keep in mind that those technical solutions might also impact macOS (see the second category).

At this moment there is no pretty method to force users away from the Safari browser and into using managed apps on ipadOS. Any solution will also impact macOS. Besides the fact that those solutions will also impact macOS, the end-user experience will also be bad. In this case the only option would be to block access from the Safari browser to the different cloud apps. Not pretty. Also, keep in mind what that would mean for the macOS users, as there are no alternatives for macOS users.

The Native mail app is a different story. There are options when already blocking basic authentication and Exchange Active Sync. In that case you’re relying on modern authentication and when you’re relying on modern authentication, for i(pad)OS devices, you’re relying on the iOS Accounts app in Azure AD. Revoking the user grants will remove the access for the user via the Native mail app (for some detailed steps have a look here). Keep in mind that the behavior will not be as pretty as before.

Category 2: Differentiating between platforms

When looking at the second category, we can (and have) to say that we need to be careful when using the Device platforms condition. There are many scenarios available in which an organization might want to differentiating between ipadOS and macOS. In any of those scenarios don’t forget the potential impact.

Both platforms will impact ipadOS. Anything configured for macOS will impact iOS when using the Native mail app or the Safari browser. Anything configured for iOS will impact all other iOS app.

More information

For more information about the impact of ipadOS with conditional access, please refer to this article Action Required: Evaluate and update Conditional Access policies in preparation for iPadOS launch.

Windows 10 MDM (PowerShell) scripting

A long, long time ago, I wrote about the MDM WMI Bridge provider. Nowadays I notice that the MDM WMI Bridge provider is still an unknown configuration layer for many IT admins. That’s why I’ve decided to do another post about the MDM WMI Bridge provider. A quick reminder: the MDM WMI Bridge provider is used to map the CSPs to WMI. This time my post is more focused on providing some examples and guidance. Besides that it’s also a nice addition on my latest posts about Windows 10 MDM configurations, policy refresh and troubleshooting. I’ll start this post by showing how to configure device settings and I’ll end this post by showing how to trigger device actions.

Keep in mind that this post is about configuring device settings. That means that every action requires to run in SYSTEM context. I advise to use PsExec for executing the scripts and tools mentioned in this post

Configuring device settings

The easiest starting point for everything related to WMI is Windows Management Instrumentation Tester (in short wbemtest). As an example I’ll take last weeks post to another level by also looking at the Reboot CSP for this post. The starting point for that is the MDM_Reboot_Schedule01 class.

Let’s start at the beginning. The root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap namespace, is the namespace that contains all the information regarding MDM in WMI. This is the MDM WMI Bridge provider. This namespace contains the WMI classes that map to CSP nodes. There are 3 methods available to get the available WMI classes:

  1. The docs about the MDM Bridge WMI provider
  2. Use wbemtest to connect to the namespace and click Enum Classes
  3. User PowerShell (Get-CIMClass) to enumerate the available classes

For this example I’ll use wbemtest to connect to the root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap namespace and to enumerate the available classes. This tool is an easy method for showing information via a UI. When knowing the exact class, it’s also possible to directly connect to that class by using Open Class instead of Enum Classes.

In this example, I know the class, which enables me to open the specific MDM_Reboot_Schedule01 class. Connecting to that class, provides me with the available properties (DailyRecurrent, InstanceID, ParentID, Single). These properties are well documented in the earlier mentioned article. In some scenarios, the classes and/or properties are not yet documented. In those scenarios wbemtest can be a very good starting point for getting the required information.

Now the available classes and properties are known, it’s time to have a look at the available options. As it’s basically standard WMI, at this point, there are also the standard WMI PowerShell scripting options available (Get, New, Remove and Modify). Below are some basic examples of using the CimCmdlets for WMI. Having mentioned that, I also deliberately left out some real New-CimInstance and Remove-CimInstance examples, as the example that I use for this post doesn’t support those actions. The MDM_Reboot_Schedule01 class already contains an instance and can’t contain multiple instances. Below are some generic example of using those cmdlets.

#Enumerate available instances
Get-CimInstance -Namespace $namespaceName -ClassName $className
#Create a new instance
New-CimInstance -Namespace $namespaceName -ClassName $className -Property @{}
#Get a specific instance 
$instanceObject = Get-CimInstance -Namespace $namespaceName -ClassName $className -Filter "ParentID='$parentID' and InstanceID='$instanceID'"

#Remove a specific instance
Remove-CimInstance -CimInstance $instanceObject

That basically means that it’s only possible to modify the available instance in the MDM_Reboot_Schedule01 class. That instance is Schedule. The Schedule instance can be adjusted by adding a value to the Single property and/ or the DailyRecurrent property. Those properties are used to actually create the specified schedule. Just like in the CSP configuration, the date and time value is ISO8601 and in UTC. The example below will get the Schedule instance in the root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap namespace, and will modify the Single property to configure a new single scheduled reboot.

#Declare variables
$namespaceName = "root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap"
$className = "MDM_Reboot_Schedule01"
$parentID = "./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot"
$instanceID = "Schedule"
$singleSchedule = "2019-10-01T22:00:00Z"

#Get a specific instance
$instanceObject = Get-CimInstance -Namespace $namespaceName -ClassName $className -Filter "ParentID='$parentID' and InstanceID='$instanceID'"

#Adjust a specific property
$instanceObject.Single = $singleSchedule

#Modify an existing instance
Set-CimInstance -CimInstance $instanceObject

Triggering device actions

Besides configuring settings via the MDM WMI Bridge provider, it’s also possible to trigger actions via the provider. When still looking at the Reboot CSP, that CSP also contains a node to execute RebootNow. RebootNow will trigger a reboot within 5 minutes. That action is available within the Intune console as a Restart action for a device. The nice thing is that this action can also be triggered via the MDM WMI Bridge provider.

Let’s skip the beginning about connecting to the WMI namespace and directly navigate to the required WMI class. The MDM_Reboot class. When connecting to the MDM_Reboot class, by using wbemtest, it’s immediately clear why wbemtest is such a nice and easy tool. After connecting to the class, wbemtest immediately provides an overview of the available methods. In this case the RebootNowMethod method.

Triggering the RebootNowMethod method, via PowerShell, will provide an alternative (and very creative) method for rebooting a device. This method is well documented in the earlier mentioned documentation. In some scenarios, the methods are not yet documented. In those scenarios wbemtest can be a very good starting point for getting the required information.

The RebootNowMethod method can be triggered by getting the available instance of the MDM_Reboot class. That instance is Reboot. That instance can be used to trigger the RebootNowMethod method. The example below will get the Reboot instance in the root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap namespace, and will trigger the RebootNowMethod method to trigger a reboot within five minutes.

#Declare variables
$namespaceName = "root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap"
$className = "MDM_Reboot"
$parentID = "./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot"
$instanceID = "Reboot"
$methodName = "RebootNowMethod"

#Get a specific instance
$instanceObject = Get-CimInstance -Namespace $namespaceName -ClassName $className -Filter "ParentID='$parentID' and InstanceID='$instanceID'"

#Trigger specific method
Invoke-CimMethod -InputObject $instanceObject -MethodName $methodName

Now let’s end this post by having a look at the effect of triggering the RebootNowMethod method. Below is an example of a simplified version (read: a one-liner) of the previous script. Just for demo purposes. After triggering that the RebootNowMethod method, the device will immediately provide a popup with a reboot notification.

More information

For more information about PowerShell and the MDM WMI Bridge provider, have a look at this article about Using PowerShell scripting with the WMI Bridge Provider.

Scheduling a reboot via Windows 10 MDM

This week is also about configuring Windows 10 devices. This week is all about scheduling a reboot on a Windows 10 device by using Microsoft Intune and Windows 10 MDM. That can be useful for scheduling reboots on for example shared devices. Simply making sure that even those type of devices get a reboot every now and then, or making sure that specific configurations or installations are getting fully applied. This can be achieved by using the Reboot CSP. In this post I’ll have a look at the available policy settings and the configuration of those policy settings. I’ll end this post by having a look at the results of the configuration.

Available policy settings

The Reboot CSP can be used to configure reboot settings. That CSP contains only a few policy settings and methods (nodes). The required policy setting for this post is available as a policy setting (node) in this CSP. The root node of the Reboot CSP is ./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot and the table below describes the nodes below.

PolicyDescription
RebootNowThis node can be used to execute a reboot of the device. It will trigger a reboot within 5 minutes to allow the user to wrap up any active work. This method is used when triggering a Restart via the Intune console.
Schedule/SingleThis node can be used to execute a reboot of the device at a scheduled date and time. Setting a null (empty) date will delete an existing schedule. The date and time value is ISO8601, and both, the date and time, are required.
Example: 2019-10-01T22:00:00Z
Schedule/DailyRecurrentThis node can be used to execute a reboot of the device, each day, at a scheduled time starting at the configured time and date. Setting a null (empty) date will delete an existing schedule. The date and time value is ISO8601, and both, the date and time, are required.
Example: 2019-10-02T21:00:00Z

Configuring the policy settings

Now let’s continue by looking at the actual configuration of the different configurable policy settings of the Reboot CSP. That means configuring a single reboot schedule and a daily recurrent reboot schedule. This can be achieved by using a custom device configuration profile. The following four steps walk through the configuration of the single reboot schedule, by using the information of above (including the example values).

The daily recurrent reboot schedule can be achieved by following the same steps and simply adjusting the OMA-URI and the Value. The screenshots below show both configurations. Also, by using two different Data type configurations. After creating the profile, it can be assigned like any other device configuration profile.

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune Device configuration Profiles to open the Devices configuration – Profiles blade
  2. On the Devices configuration – Profiles blade, click Create profile to open the Create profile blade
  3. On the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create
  • Name: Provide a valid name
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
  • Platform: Windows 10 and later
  • Profile type: Custom
  • Settings: See step 4
  1. On the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade, provide the following information and click Add to open the Add row blade. On the Add row blade, provide the following information and click OK (and click OK in the Custom OMA-URI blade)
  • Name: Single reboot schedule
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
  • OMA-URI: ./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot/Schedule/Single
  • Data type: Select String
  • Value: 2019-10-01T22:00:00Z

Note: The same configuration can be achieved by using the Date and time data type and selecting the date and time in the UI (as shown below). Keep in mind that it will translate the selected date and time to the UTC time, which in my case is currently a 2 hour difference. To remove the schedule, use 0000-00-00T00:00:00Z as a value.

Result on the device

After assigning the created device configuration profile(s), it’s time to have a look at the results on a device. The Reboot CSP will create a scheduled task for the configured reboot schedules (as shown below). Those scheduled tasks are available at Microsoft > Windows > EnteriseMgmt > {EnrollmentID} > Reboot.

As I’ve configured a single reboot schedule and a daily recurrent reboot schedule, the screenshot below shows a task RebootCSP daily recurrent reboot and a task RebootCSP scheduled reboot. Those tasks are used for performing the actual reboots by using deviceenroller.exe -ForcedReboot.

After successfully rebooting multiple devices, I’ve noticed the following to keep in mind:

  • The Last Run Time of the scheduled tasks never updates after a reboot, as if the scheduled task is recreated with a new Next Run Time.
  • The result of the custom device configuration profile in Microsoft Intune still shows a Remediation failed error message, while the configuration is successful.

More information

For more information about the Reboot CSP, have a look at the documentation about the Reboot CSP.

Windows 10 MDM troubleshooting

This week another new blog post related to Windows 10 MDM. In the recent weeks I’ve discussed policy refresh, some configurations and now some troubleshooting. This post is also triggered by my previous as I used the MDM Diagnostics Tool (MdmDiagnosticsTool.exe) as an example. Based on that example I’ve received some requests for more information. There are more useful tools like dsregcmd, but this post will focus on the MDM Diagnostics Tool, as there’s not that much information available. In this post I’ll provide information about the usage and results of the MDM Diagnostics Tool as having the right information is really useful for troubleshooting Windows 10 MDM managed devices.

Introduction of the MDM Diagnostics Tool

The MDM Diagnostics Tool is a command line tool that can be used to gather information. Information related to specific MDM areas. Depending on the chosen MDM area, the MDM Diagnostics Tool will gather the related events, registry, logs and more, all consolidated into a single folder or single file. The MDM Diagnostics Tool is one of the best starting points for the IT admin, for a consolidated source for troubleshooting.

Usage of the MDM Diagnostics Tool

The MDM Diagnostics Tool can has four different usage options. The first usage option is the generic option to output MDM diagnostics info only, to a given folder.

MdmDiagnosticsTool.exe -out <output folder path>

The second usage option is to collect predefined area logs and to create a cab file with the results. The possible areas are available in the registry under: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MdmDiagnostics\Area. At this moment those areas are Autopilot, DeviceEnrollment, DeviceProvisioning and TPM (as shown below).

MdmDiagnosticsTool.exe -area <area name(s)> -cab <output cab file path>

The third usage option is to collect predefined area logs and to create a zip file with the results. The possible areas are the same as for the second usage option. Only the file type of the result is different.

MdmDiagnosticsTool.exe -area <area name(s)> -zip <output zip file path>

The fourth usage option is to collect information specified in a XML-file and to create a zip file with the results. I haven’t found out (and not really looked at) how to construct a working XML-file for that option. To use the MDM Diagnostics Tool in combination with Microsoft Intune, have a look at my previous post.

MdmDiagnosticsTool.exe -xml <xml file of information to gather> -zip <output zip file path> -server <MDM Server to alert>

Output of the MDM Diagnostics Tool

The output of the different usage options of the MDM Diagnostics Tool is also different. As usage option 2 and 3 contain the same information and I can’t really use option 4, let’s have a look at the output of option 1 and 2. Below is a quick overview of the output, followed by an explanation of the diagnostic data that is available in the output.

Output of usage option 1

The first usage option provides the generic MDM diagnostics that contains the following information:

  • DeviceManagement-Enterprise-Diagnostics-Provider.evtx – This event log contains the information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device. It also shows the MDM PolicyManager errors.
  • MDMDiagReport.html (and related xml) – This is the same report that can be generated by using the Settings panel and generating the Advanced Diagnostics Report. That report shows the applied configuration states of the devices, including Policy CSP settings, certificates, configuration sources, and resource information.
  • Microsoft-Windows-AAD.evtx – This event log contains information (and errors) related to Azure AD communications. From device registration until token requests.
  • Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Core.evtx – This event log contains a lot of information mainly related to logon tasks and runonce actions on the device.

Output of usage option 2 (Autopilot)

The second usage option, with the Autopilot area specified, provides generic MDM diagnostics and specific Autopilot related diagnostics that contains the following information:

  • AgentExecutor.log – This log file contains information about the PowerShell scripts that are executed by the Intune Management Extention.
  • AutopilotConciergeFile.json – This json file contains the language and keyboard configuration information during a self deployment.
  • AutopilotDDSZTDFile.json – This json file contains the configuration information during a regular deployment.
  • ClientHealth.log – This log file contains the health information of the Intune Management Extention.
  • DeviceHash_DESKTOP-U1JNF0E.csv – This csv file contains the device hash information of the device.
  • DiagnosticLogCSP_Collector_Autopilot.etl – This event trace log file contains trace information of the Autopilot process of the device.
  • DiagnosticLogCSP_Collector_DeviceEnrollment.etl – This event trace log file contains trace information of the device enrollment process of the device.
  • DiagnosticLogCSP_Collector_DeviceProvisioning.etl – This event trace log file contains trace information of the device provisioning process of the device.
  • IntuneManagementExtension.log – This log file contains information about the Win32 app deployments that are performed by the Intune Management Extension.
  • LicensingDiag.cab (and related LicensingDiag_Output.txt) – These files contain licensing and diagnostic information.
  • MDMDiagReport.html (and related xml) – This is the same report that can be generated by using the Settings panel and generating the Advanced Diagnostics Report. That report shows the applied configuration states of the devices, including Policy CSP settings, certificates, configuration sources, and resource information.
  • MdmDiagReport_RegistryDump.reg – This registry file contains exported registry information related to Autopilot, but also related to the provisioning of the device and the policy manager. Basically everything related to MDM management.
  • microsoft-windows-aad-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to Azure AD communications. From device registration until token requests.
  • microsoft-windows-appxdeploymentserver-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to packaging, deploying, or querying app packages.
  • microsoft-windows-assignedaccess-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) related to assigned access (kiosk mode).
  • microsoft-windows-assignedaccessbroker-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) related to the broker of assigned access (kiosk mode).
  • microsoft-windows-assignedaccessbroker-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to the broker of assigned access (kiosk mode).
  • microsoft-windows-assignedaccess-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to assigned access (kiosk mode).
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-debug.evtx – This event log contains debug information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-moderndeployment-diagnostics-provider-autopilot.evtx – This event log contains the operational information (and errors) regarding the Autopilot profile settings and OOBE flow of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-moderndeployment-diagnostics-provider-managementservice.evtx – This event log contains the operational information (and errors) regarding the management service of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-provisioning-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains the admin information (and errors) regarding adding packages to the device.
  • microsoft-windows-shell-core-operational.evtx – This event log contains a lot of information mainly related to logon tasks and runonce actions on the device.
  • microsoft-windows-user device registration-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) regarding the device registration (status).
  • setupact.log – This log file contains information about the errors that occur during the Windows installation process of the device.
  • TpmHliInfo_Output.txt – This file contains information about the support of TPM 2.0 for the TPM of the device.

Output of usage option 2 (DeviceEnrollment)

The second usage option, with the DeviceEnrollment area specified, provides generic MDM diagnostics and specific device enrollment related diagnostics that contains the following information:

  • DiagnosticLogCSP_Collector_DeviceEnrollment.etl – This event trace log file contains trace information of the device enrollment process of the device.
  • MDMDiagHtmlReport.html (and related xml) – This is the same report that can be generated by using the Settings panel and generating the Advanced Diagnostics Report. That report shows the applied configuration states of the devices, including Policy CSP settings, certificates, configuration sources, and resource information.
  • MdmDiagReport_RegistryDump.reg – This registry file contains exported registry information related to Autopilot, but also related to the provisioning of the device and the policy manager. Basically everything related to MDM management.
  • microsoft-windows-aad-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to Azure AD communications. From device registration until token requests.
  • microsoft-windows-appxdeploymentserver-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to packaging, deploying, or querying app packages.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-debug.evtx – This event log contains debug information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-moderndeployment-diagnostics-provider-managementservice.evtx – This event log contains the operational information (and errors) regarding the management service of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-provisioning-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains the admin information (and errors) regarding adding packages to the device.

Output of usage option 2 (DeviceProvisioning)

The second usage option, with the DeviceProvisiong area specified, provides generic MDM diagnostics and specific device provisioning related diagnostics that contains the following information:

  • DiagnosticLogCSP_Collector_DeviceProvisioning.etl – This event trace log file contains trace information of the device provisioning process of the device.
  • MDMDiagHtmlReport.html (and related xml) – This is the same report that can be generated by using the Settings panel and generating the Advanced Diagnostics Report. That report shows the applied configuration states of the devices, including Policy CSP settings, certificates, configuration sources, and resource information.
  • MdmDiagReport_RegistryDump.reg – This registry file contains exported registry information related to Autopilot, but also related to the provisioning of the device and the policy manager. Basically everything related to MDM management.
  • microsoft-windows-aad-operational.evtx – This event log contains operational information (and errors) related to Azure AD communications. From device registration until token requests.
  • microsoft-windows-devicemanagement-enterprise-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains admin information (and errors) regarding the MDM sessions of the device.
  • microsoft-windows-provisioning-diagnostics-provider-admin.evtx – This event log contains the admin information (and errors) regarding adding packages to the device.
  • microsoft-windows-shell-core-operational.evtx – This event log contains a lot of information mainly related to logon tasks and runonce actions on the device.

Output of usage option 2 (TPM)

The second usage option, with the TPM area specified, provides generic MDM diagnostics specific certificate and TPM related diagnostics that contains the following information:

  • CertReq_enrollaik_Output.txt – This file contains information about an attempt to enroll an AIK key for the device.
  • CertUtil_tpminfo_Output.txt – This file contains information about the TPM of the device.
  • MDMDiagHtmlReport.html (and related xml) – This is the same report that can be generated by using the Settings panel and generating the Advanced Diagnostics Report. That report shows the applied configuration states of the devices, including Policy CSP settings, certificates, configuration sources, and resource information.
  • MdmDiagReport_RegistryDump.reg – This registry file contains exported registry information related to Autopilot, but also related to the provisioning of the device and the policy manager. Basically everything related to MDM management.

More information

For more information related to troubleshooting Windows 10 MDM related issues, please refer to the following documentation:

Triggering devices to upload (diagnostic) files to cloud storage

This week is all about triggering Windows 10 devices to upload (diagnostic) files to cloud storage. That can be very useful for gathering information and diagnosing potential issues. Starting with Windows 10, version 1903, Microsoft added additional functionality to the DiagnosticLog CSP. The DiagnosticLog CSP is used for generating and collecting diagnostic information from the device and the additional functionality enables triggering devices to upload existing event logs, log files, and registry values to cloud storage. That actually opens the route to some really nice scenarios regarding the collection of information on MDM managed Windows 10 devices. I’ll start this post by providing some information about the required setting, followed by going through the steps of configuring that setting. I’ll end this post by showing the administrator experience.

Available policy settings and configuration options

Let’s start by having a look at the available policy settings. The required policy setting for this post is available as a policy setting in a new node of the DiagnosticLog CSP. The root node of the DiagnosticLog CSP is ./Vendor/MSFT/DiagnosticLog and the table below describes the relevant nodes below.

PolicyDescription
DiagnosticArchive This is the root node for the DiagnosticArchive functionality (only “Get” functionality).
DiagnosticArchive/ArchiveDefinitionThis policy setting can be used to set an XML snippet (as a string) describing what data to gather and where to upload it when done. That XML defines what the data that should be collected and that should be compressed into a zip file to be uploaded to Azure blob storage (“Add” and “Execute” functionality).
DiagnosticArchive/ArchiveResults This policy setting displays the results of the last archive run (only “Get” functionality).

The required policy setting for this post is the DiagnosticArchive/ArchiveDefinition node. That policy setting requires an XML formatted string as input. The format of the XML is shown below. The elements are all wrapped in the Collection element and it contains at least the an ID and SasUrl element. Those elements are required to make sure that the policy setting will be executed and that the collected data is sent to the correct location. The collected data will be uploaded in the format DiagLogs-{ComputerName}-YYYYMMDDTHHMMSSZ.zip. That format is not configurable.

<Collection>
     <ID>{id}</ID>
     <SasUrl>{web address}/{container}{key}</SasUrl>
     <RegistryKey>{registry key}</RegistryKey>
     <Command>{command}</Command>
     <FoldersFiles>{file or folder}</FoldersFiles>
     <Events>{event viewer}</Events>
</Collection>

The usage of the different elements in the XML formatted string is described in the table below.

ElementDescription
IDThe ID element is used to specify a unique GUID value that defines the run of the DiagnosticLog CSP. The ID can be generated by using the New-Guid cmdlet. A new ID is required to trigger a new collection.
Example value: 91d667ae-18d3-46c6-ae43-0bb6d6ac25f4
SasUrl The SasUrl element is used to specify the storage location for the collected data. The SasUrl can be copied from Blob service SAS URL of the storage container, with the addition of the storage container name (make sure to escape special characters).
Example value: <![CDATA[https://{storageaccount}.blob.core.windows.net/{storagecontainer}?sv=2018-03-28&ss=b&srt=o&sp=c&se=2019-10-30T04:19:14Z&st=2019-09-17T19:19:14Z&spr=https&sig=qpVr6NFegQfjIWYV4uwsAqbT1FtgzCtz8P%2Bbrhl6%2FQM%3D]]>
RegistrykeyThe Registrykey element (there can be multiple) can be used to specify a registry key that should be exported and collected.
Example value: HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft
FoldersFilesThe FoldersFiles element (there can be multiple) can be used to specify a file or folder that should exported and collected.
Example value: C:\Windows\Temp\MDM*.*
Command The Command element (there can be multiple) can be used to specify a command that should be executed.
Example value: %windir%\system32\mdmdiagnosticstool.exe -out C:\Windows\Temp\MDM\
Events The Events element (there can be multiple) can be used to specify an Event Log that should exported and collected (specify the name of the log).
Example value: Microsoft-Windows-User Device Registration/Admin

Constructing and configuring the policy setting

Now let’s continue by constructing the XML formatted string and by having a look at the configuration. The first step is constructing the XML format string that will be used during the configuration. The main use case of this post is gathering troubleshooting information. For that reason the XML formatted string is constructed with information to gather the policy registry key, to run the MDM diagnostics tool, to gather the result of the MDM diagnostic tool and to gather additional event logs. A nice combination to show all the different options. The example constructed for this post is provided below. It contains the earlier mentioned example values. The only elements that should still be added are the ID and the SasUrl. Those elements are environment specific.

<Collection>
    <ID>{GUID}</ID>
    <SasUrl><![CDATA[{web address}/{container}{key}]]></SasUrl>
    <RegistryKey>HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft</RegistryKey>
    <Command>%windir%\system32\mdmdiagnosticstool.exe -out C:\Windows\Temp\MDM\</Command>
    <FoldersFiles>C:\Windows\Temp\MDM\*.*</FoldersFiles>
    <Events>Microsoft-Windows-User Device Registration/Admin</Events>
</Collection>

After constructing the XML it’s time for the actual configuration of the policy setting. The following four steps walk through the actual configuration steps of a custom device configuration profile. That device configuration profile can be used to configure the ArchiveDefinition policy setting. After creating the device configuration profile, simply assign the profile like any other device configuration profile.

  1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune Device configuration Profiles to open the Devices configuration – Profiles blade
  2. On the Devices configuration – Profiles blade, click Create profile to open the Create profile blade
  3. On the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create
  • Name: Provide a valid name
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
  • Platform: Windows 10 and later
  • Profile type: Custom
  • Settings: See step 4
  1. On the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade, provide the following information and click Add to open the Add row blade. On the Add row blade, provide the following information and click OK (and click OK in the Custom OMA-URI blade)
  • Name: Provide a valid name
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
  • OMA-URI: ./Vendor/MSFT/DiagnosticLog/DiagnosticArchive/ArchiveDefinition
  • Data type: Select String
  • Value: {XML}

Administrator experience

Let’s end this post by having a look at the administrator experience. Below on the first row on the left is an example of the collected data in the storage account. It provides an overview of the devices that collected and uploaded the requested data. All conform the mentioned naming standard. Below on the first row on the right is an example of the same data, but downloaded and extracted. The XML provides an overview of the results of the different actions to gather data. The folders contain the data of the different actions. The number of folders matches the number of actions in the provided XML. The lines even match (line 1 is folder 1, etc.).

Below on the second row is an example of how the information is logged in the registry. The MdmDiagnostics key contains a value that contains the results of the latest run, the Results value, and a value that contains the initial XML, the XML value. That key also contains a key per diagnostics collection run. The ID of the latest run is registered in the earlier mentioned values.

More information

For more information about triggering devices to upload files to cloud storage, see the DiagnosticLog CSP for triggering devices to upload files to cloud section in the DiagnosticLog CSP documentation.