Require an Internet connection during device setup

This week I’m going to look at a well hidden configuration option that is recently introduced and can be really useful in specific scenarios. That configuration option is to require an Internet connection during the device setup. Requiring an Internet connection during device setup can be useful when trying to prevent users from resetting the device (either accidently or on purpose) and configuring it without an Internet connection, as configuring a device without Internet connectivity would enable a user to configure the device with a local user and without enrollment. In this blog post, I’ll start with a short introduction about why this configuration option would be useful and what the options are with this configuration option. Followed by the configuration steps and the end-user experience.

Introduction

Configuring a device without Internet connectivity would enable a user to configure the device with a local user and without an enrollment to Microsoft Intune (and Azure AD). That’s often what organizations want to prevent, as it disconnects a device from the organization. Minor detail, this configuration option must be configured once. Of course it would be great if this configuration option could be a Windows default, or available via the Windows Autopilot configuration. However, to my understanding this is currently not possible due to legal requirements. At this moment it’s simply legally not allowed to require an Internet connection on a device during the initial setup. Having said that, as this setting is configured via the TenantLockdown CSP, I can imagine that, in a Windows Autopilot for existing devices scenario, this can be configured as a Windows default, via PowerShell, by using the WMI Bridge Provider.

Configuration

Before looking at the configuration, let’s start with a few important requirements and limitations:

  • The device must run Windows 10, version 1809 or later;
  • The device must be configured once before the setting is applicable;

Now let’s continue by looking at the required configuration. The following four steps walk through the steps to get create a new device configuration profile and the specific configuration option. That device configuration profile can be assigned to an Azure AD group.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune > Device configuration > Profiles to open the Device configuration – Profiles blade;
2 On the Device configuration – Profiles blade, select Create profile to open the Create profile blade;
3a On the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create;

  • Name: Provide a unique name for the device configuration profile;
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a description for the device configuration profile;
  • Platform: Select Windows 10 and later;
  • Profile type: Select Device restrictions;
  • Settings: See 3b;
3b On the Device restrictions blade, select General to open the General blade. On the General blade, select Require with Require users to connect to network during device setup and click OK to return to the Device restrictions blade. On the Device restrictions blade, click OK;
OOBE-Configure-Network

Note: This setting must be configured before it’s applicable. In other words, it’s not applicable during the initial out-of-box experience.

End-user experience

Let’s end this post by looking at the end-user experience. Once the configuration is in place and a reset is performed on the device, there will be an additional check during the device setup. When the device is not connected to the Internet, the end-user will receive a message as shown below. It requires the user to connect to the Internet. The user will not be able to continue without that connection. Once the user is connected to the Internet, the page below will show a Next button that can be used to continue with the device setup.

OOBE-Connect-Network

More information

For more information regarding the device configuration options and the TenantLockdown CSP, please refer to the following articles:

Windows Autopilot self-deploying mode

This week a new blog post about Windows Autopilot. More specifically, Windows Autopilot self-deploying mode. Autopilot self-deploying mode is really useful for devices that are function specific, like for example kiosk devices. The biggest benefit is that a device with a wired network connection (with Internet) can be completely configured without any user interaction. Simply connect the device to the wired network and power it on! Real zero touch provisioning! In this post I’ll provide the configuration steps to create that experience, followed by some known errors and the end-user experience.

Configuration

Let’s start with a few important requirements and limitations:

  • The device must run Windows 10, version 1809 or later;
  • The device can only be Azure AD joined (Active Directory join is not supported);
  • The device must be a physical device with TPM 2.0 (virtual machine is not supported);

Now let’s continue by looking at the available configuration options. In this case I’ll look at the different available configurations options and the related impact of those configuration options. The following four steps walk through the steps to get create a new Windows Autopilot self-deploying profile (including the available settings). That deployment profile can be assigned to an Azure AD group that contains devices.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune > Device enrollment > Windows enrollment to open the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade;
2 On the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade, select Deployment Profiles in the Windows Autopilot Deployment Program section to open the Windows Autopilot deployment profiles blade;
3 On Windows Autopilot deployment profiles blade, select Create profile to open the Create profile blade;
4a

WA-SD-CreateProfileOn the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create;

  • Name: Provide a unique name for the Windows Autopilot deployment profile;
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a description for the Windows Autopilot deployment profile;
  • Convert all targeted devices to Autopilot: Select Yes to automatically convert Intune managed devices to Autopilot;
  • Deployment mode: Select Self-Deploying (preview), as that deployment mode provides the functionality that is needed for this post;
  • Join to Azure AD as: Azure AD joined is selected by default and grayed-out, as it’s the only configuration option supported for Windows Autopilot self-deploying devices;
  • Out-of-box experience (OOBE): See 4b.

Note: The Self-Deploying (preview) deployment mode, defines the available Azure AD settings and the available out-of-box experience (OOBE) settings.

4b

On the Out-of-box experience (OOBE) blade, provide the following information and click Save.

  • Language (Region): Select the Language that should be automatically configured during the Windows Autopilot self-deploying experience. This configuration will only be performed when the device is on a wired network connection (with Internet);
  • Automatically configure keyboard: Select Yes to automatically configure the keyboard based on the selected Language. This setting is only available when a Language is configured and this configuration will only be performed when the device is on a wired network connection (with Internet);
  • End user license agreement (EULA): Select Hide to hide the EULA during the Windows Autopilot self-deploying experience;
  • Privacy Settings: Select Hide to the hide the privacy settings during the Windows Autopilot self-deploying experience;
  • Hide change account options: Select Hide to hide the change account options during the Windows Autopilot self-deploying experience;
  • User account type: Select Standard to only make any user on the device a standard user. With the exception of global administrators and company administrators;
  • Apply computer name template (Windows Insider Only): Create a computer name, according to the configured template, for devices at initial startup;
WA-SD-OOBE

Note: The Autopilot settings can only be downloaded when a network connection is in place. That’s the reason why a wired network connection should be in place. When a wired network connection is not available, it’s required to configure the region, the keyboard and a Wi-Fi.

Known errors

During the testing of Windows Autopilot self-deploying, I ran into multiple errors. More information about an error can always be found in the Event Viewer, at Application and Services Logs > Microsoft > Windows > Provisioning-Diagnostics-Provider > AutoPilot (thank you for the reminder Sandy!). The errors that I’ve seen on screen are documented and explained in the table below. If you’ve seen errors that are not on this list, let me know and I’ll add them.


Error Description
0x800705B4 This error means that the device is either a virtual machine, or does not have TPM 2.0, and is not capable of running Autopilot self-deploying.
0x801c03ea This error means that the device is TPM 2.0 capable, but that the TPM still needs to be upgraded from 1.2 to 2.0.
0xc1036501 This error means that the device cannot do an automatic MDM enrollment, because there are multiple MDM configurations in Azure AD.

End-user experience

As always, let’s end this post by having a look at the end-user experience. The end-user experience will provide a welcome message (see below) after receiving the Autopilot deployment profile and an automatic restart. An easy differentiation between the Autopilot user-driven experience and the Autopilot self-deploying experience, besides the interaction, is the logo that’s used. At this moment the Autopilot user-driven experience uses the square logo of the Azure AD company branding and the Autopilot self-deploying experience uses the banner logo of the Azure AD company branding.

20181104_165048

Note: From and administrator perspective, an Autopilot self-deploying device can be easily recognized by the Management name of the device. It contains a GUID instead of a username.

More information

For more information about enrolling Windows devices by using Windows Autopilot self-deploying mode, please refer to the documentation named Windows Autopilot Self-Deploying mode.

Join us at Experts Live Europe in Prague

b-B6v-rUA bit less than two weeks from now, October 25-26, Experts Live Europe will be in Prague. Together with my finest colleague, Arjan Vroege, I will deliver two sessions! And we hope to see you there!

Experts Live Europe is a Microsoft community conference with a focus on Microsoft cloud, datacenter and workplace management. During this conference, top experts from around the world present discussion panels, ask-the-experts sessions and breakout sessions and cover the latest products, technologies and solutions.

About our sessions

The maybe-not-that-sexy version of modern management – A true story –

In this session, we will take you into the real world of modern management. Modern management is a great buzzword and by now we all know the lovely story of modern management. We all know how it should work, but we often lack the real-world examples of organizations using modern management. During this session, we will show you how we internally deployed Windows 10 with Azure AD join and Intune management for over 10k devices. What choices did we make? Which challenges did we run into? Did we close all the gaps? We’ll try to answer these question. To conclude will also look at the available options right now and how they could have helped us. We will also have a couple of cool demos. To provide a sneak preview, here is a small list with subjects that will be part of our session: Win32 apps, MSIX and Windows AutoPilot.

Thursday Friday 2:40 PM – 3.40 PM

Create your ultimate hybrid workplace, what options do you have?

During this session we will take you into the world of the hybrid workplace. The modern workplace is a great story, for cloud only organizations, but the reality is often that there are a lot of components still on-premises. During this session we will touch the different delegate subjects from identity until apps and from management until connectivity. That means, a lot of ground to cover and a lot of choices to be made. Besides that we will have a couple of cool demos, here is a small list with a sneak preview of subjects that will be part of our session:  Pass-through authentication, Co-management, Win32 apps, MSIX and Azure AD Application Proxy.

Friday 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Make sure that you don’t miss these sessions!

Assign a user to a Windows AutoPilot device

This blog post uses capabilities that are added in Windows 10, version 1809, which is currently still in preview.

This week a short blog about another relatively new Windows AutoPilot feature. This week is all about assigning a specific user to a specific Windows AutoPilot device. That enables an administrator to directly assign a user to a Windows AutoPilot device. Assigning a user to a Windows AutoPilot device will make sure that the username will be pre-filled during Windows setup. It also lets the administrator set a custom greeting name, which will also be added during the Windows setup. In this post I’ll show the actual configuration steps, followed by the end-user experience.

Configuration

Before starting with the actual configuration steps, it’s important to name a few prerequisites.

  • Azure AD company branding is configured;
  • Device is running Windows 10, version 1809 or later;
  • User is Microsoft Intune licensed

When the prerequisites are in place, it’s time to start looking at the actual configuration. The following five steps walk through assigning a user to a Windows AutoPilot device.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Device enrollment > Windows enrollment to open the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade;
2 On the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade, click Devices to open the Windows AutoPilot devices blade;
3 On the Windows AutoPilot devices blade, select the specific device (make sure to check the box) and click Assign user to open the Select user blade;
AP-AssignUser
4 On the Select user blade, select the specific user and click Select, which will open the Properties blade of the device;
5

AP-UserFriiendlyNameOn Properties blade of the device, provide the User Friendly Name and click OK to return to the Windows AutoPilot devices blade.

Note: This will provide a message like in this case “Awesome dude has ben successfully assigned to 3008-9109-1000-6969-987…

End-user experience

Now let’s end this post by looking at the end-user experience when using a user-driven deployment. After configuring the location and the keyboard, the user will get a personal welcome message. The message includes the configured custom user friendly name and the username will be preconfigured (as shown below). The user only needs to provide a password and click Next.

AP-UserExperience

Note: This experience does not work when used in combination with ADFS.

More information

For more information about assigning a user to a Windows AutoPilot device, please refer to the documentation Enroll Windows devices by using the Windows AutoPilot | Assign a user to a specific Autopilot device.

Block access to company resources if certain apps are installed

This week is all about device compliance. More specifically, this week is all about the just introduced capability to block access to company resources if certain apps are installed. This enables organizations to truly blacklist specific apps that are not allowed when using devices to access company resources. In this case it’s not about the apps used for accessing the company resources, but it’s really about the apps installed on the device. In this post I’ll provide the configuration steps, by using OWA for iPad as an example, followed by the end-user experience.

Configuration

Before starting with the actual configuration, it’s important to get the bundle ID of the iOS app that cannot be installed. These steps are very clearly documented here. I will use OWA for iPad as an example, which has the following bundle ID: com.microsoft.exchange.ipad.

Now let’s continue by having a look at the configuration steps. The following five steps walk through the creation of a device compliance policy with at least the configuration of OWA for iPad as a restricted app. Within a device compliance policy a restricted app is what was earlier described, in this post, as blacklisted apps. After the creation of the device compliance policy, simply assign it to the applicable user group.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Device compliance > Policies;
2 On the Device compliance – Policies blade, click Create Policy to open the Create Policy blade;
3

On the Create Policy blade, provide a Name, select iOS with Platform and select Settings to open the iOS compliance policy blade;

Note: This is currently an iOS only configuration. Android is expected a bit later.

4 On the iOS compliance policy blade, select System Security to open the System Security blade;
5

On the System Security blade, navigate to the Device Security section, provide the App name, the App Bundle ID and click Add, followed by and clicking OK, OK and Create.

Note: The provided App name will be mentioned in the potential non-compliance message to the end-user and the App Bundle ID is in this example the id of the OWA for iPad app.

MSI-RestrictApp

Note: To complete this configuration, it must be used in combination with a conditional access policy that requires the device to be marked as compliant.

End-user experience

Now let’s end this post with the end-user experience. Let’s do that by looking at the end-user experience on an iOS device with OWA for iPad installed. On the left is the default message that is displayed to the end-user when trying to access company data on a non-compliant device. On the right is the message that the end-user will receive in the Company Portal app related to the compliance state of the device. In this case it will provide the end-user with a list of disallowed apps that should be uninstalled. The list shows the name of the app, as provided in the compliance policy.

IMG_0143 IMG_0144

More information

For more information about blocking access if certain apps are installed, refer to the documentation about adding a device compliance policy for iOS devices in Intune.

Remote Windows AutoPilot Reset

This blog post uses remote Windows AutoPilot Reset, to remotely trigger a device reset on Windows 10 devices. This capability is added in Windows 10, Insider Preview Build 17672 and later.

This week it’s all about (remote) Windows AutoPilot Reset. That might sounds like something really cool and really new, but it’s actually not that new. Remember my post about Windows Automatic Redeployment? Well, that functionality still exists, but with the addition to trigger the redeployment (read: reset) remotely via Microsoft Intune, this feature is rebranded to (remote) Windows AutoPilot Reset. That means that Windows Autopilot Reset removes personal files, apps, and settings, by resetting Windows 10 while still maintaining the Azure AD Join and the Microsoft Intune enrollment. In this post I’ll show the required configuration to enable Windows AutoPilot Reset, followed by the steps to trigger a remote Windows AutoPilot Reset. I’ll end this post by looking at the end-user experience.

Configure automatic redeployment

Before actually looking at the required configuration, it’s good to keep in mind that WinRE must be enabled on the device to use Windows AutoPilot Reset. Now let’s continue with the configuration to enable Windows AutoPilot Reset (previously know as Windows Automatic Redeployment). The previous time I configured it by using a custom OMA-URI, while the configuration already became available through the UI. So this time I’ll simply show the UI-setting. The following three steps walk through the creation of a new device configuration profile, including configuring the required setting. After that simply assign the created profile to a user or device group.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Device configuration > Profiles to open the Device configuration – Profiles blade;
2 On the Device configuration – Profiles blade, click Create profile to open the Create profile blade;
3a

On the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create.

  • Name: Provide a valid name for the profile;
  • Description: (Optional) Provide a description for the profile;
  • Platform: Select Windows 10 and later;
  • Profile type: Select Device restrictions;
  • Settings: See step 3b;
3b On the Device restrictions blade, select General, select Allow with Automatic Redeployment and click OK and OK;
Intune-Automatic-Redeployment

Note: Remember that it’s not a requirement to create this as a separate new profile. This setting can also be added to an existing device restrictions profile.

Trigger remote reset

Based on my previous post about Windows Automatic Redeployment, I showed how to trigger the reset locally from the device. Now let’s continue this post by looking at how to actually trigger the remote reset by using Microsoft Intune. The following three steps walk through the actions.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Devices > All devices to open the Devices – All devices blade;
2 Intune-AutoPilot-ResetOn the Devices – All devices blade, select the target device and click More > AutoPilot Reset (preview);
3 On the AutoPilot Reset (preview) – [computer name] confirmation box, click Yes;
Intune-AutoPilot-Reset-Confirmation

Note: After confirming the action will show as Action automaticRedeployment with the Status Pending. Once the action is completed the status will change to Completed.

End-user experience

Let’s end this post by looking at the end-user experience. Once the remote Windows AutoPilot is triggered the end-user will receive a notification message, as shown below. That message will tell the end-user that the system needs to restart for automatic redeployment and that the restart is scheduled in 45 minutes.

Intune-AutoPilot-Reset-Experience

More information

For more information about remote Windows AutoPilot Reset, please refer to the documentation about Reset devices with AutoPilot Reset.

Automatically assign Windows AutoPilot deployment profile to Windows AutoPilot devices

This week another (short) blog post about Windows AutoPilot. More specifically, about automatically assigning a Windows AutoPilot deployment profile to Windows AutoPilot devices. That makes it a lot easier for administrators, as this prevents the administrators from potentially forgetting to assign the deployment profile to newly imported devices. Great improvement. Also, I have to say that this subject is documented pretty good, but it could be easier to find. This post is mainly for creating awareness regarding this subject. I’ll provide the options regarding to grouping Windows AutoPilot devices and I’ll show how those options can be used to create a dynamic group.

Options

Let’s start by having a look at the configuration options regarding the grouping of Windows AutoPilot devices. The imported Windows AutoPilot devices are pre-created in Azure AD and, during that creation process, a few values are automatically set for those devices. Below is an overview of those different values.

Value Devices Explanation
[ZTDId] All Windows AutoPilot devices A unique value assigned to all imported Windows AutoPilot devices
[OrderID]:{YourOrderId} All Windows AutoPilot devices with a specific order Id An optional Id that can be specified when importing Windows AutoPilot devices
[PurchaseOrderId]:{YourPurchaseOrderId} All Windows AutoPilot devices with a specific purchase order Id An Id that is set by the OEM when importing Windows AutoPilot devices

Those different values can be used to create dynamic device groups within Azure AD. Below is an overview of the required queries per grouping of Windows AutoPilot devices.

Devices Query
All Windows AutoPilot devices (device.devicePhysicalIDs -any _ -contains “[ZTDId]”)
All Windows AutoPilot devices with a specific order Id (device.devicePhysicalIds -any _ -eq “[OrderID]:{YourOrderId}”)
All Windows AutoPilot devices with a specifc purchase order Id (device.devicePhysicalIds -any _ -eq “[PurchaseOrderId]:{YourPurchaseOrderId }”)

Note: These values can be seen by simply using Graph Explorer, querying https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/devices and looking for the physicalIds value.

Configuration

Let’s continue by having a look at how to use these different values and queries for actually grouping all Windows AutoPilot devices. The following 3 steps walk through the creation of a dynamic device group that can use the different queries mentioned earlier.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Groups or navigate to Azure Active Directory > Groups to open the Groups – All groups blade;;
2 On the Groups – All groups blade, click New group to open the Group blade;
3a

AAD_DD_GroupOn the Group blade, provide the following information and click Create.

  • Group Type: Select Security;
  • Group name: Provide a valid name for the group;
  • Group description: (Optional) Provide a description for the group;
  • Membership type: Select Dynamic Device;
  • Dynamic device members: See step 3b;
3b

AAD_DD_RulesOn the Dynamic membership rules blade, select Advanced rule, provide one of the mentioned queries (depending on the type of AutoPilot devices selection) and click Add query;

Note: The example on the right is showing the query for all AutoPilot devices.

Once the dynamic device group is created it can used for assigning Windows AutoPilot deployment profiles. That enables the administrator to automatically assign a Windows AutoPilot deployment profile to all Windows AutoPilot devices.

Result

Let’s end this post by having a look at the results. Below, on the left, is a quick overview, via Microsoft Graph, about the device information of CLDCLN879139238. That shows the name of the device and the value related to all imported Windows AutoPilot devices. Below on the right is an overview of that same device, showing it as a member of the earlier created dynamic device group.

AAD_DD_Example2 AAD_DD_Example1

More information

For more information regarding the latest Windows AutoPilot features and the configuration steps, please refer to the following articles:

Conditional access and legacy authentication

This week is still all about conditional access. More specifically, the recently introduced feature to create conditions based on the use of legacy authentication (including older Office versions), which is currently still in preview. By now, I’ve done my fair share of posts regarding blocking legacy authentication (see for example here and here), but now it’s literally getting super easy. And no need for AD FS anymore. This helps with easily closing another backdoor, as previously legacy authentication simply bypassed any conditional access policy. In this post I’ll walk through the required configurations followed by the end-user experience.

Configuration

Before going through the configuration let’s start with a quick reminder about legacy authentication. Very simplistically said, legacy authentication is basic authentication that uses a single authentication factor in the form of a username and password and cannot force a second authentication factor (think about protocols like, POP3, IMAP, SMTP, MAPI and EWS and apps like, Office 2010). As I have no need for legacy authentication in my environment, I will block all legacy authentication to my apps. The following seven steps walk through the simple configuration to create a conditional access policy that blocks the access to all cloud apps for all users when using legacy clients.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Conditional access > Policies or to Azure Active Directory > Conditional access > Policies;
2 On the Policies blade, click New policy to open the New blade;
3 AAD_CA_UsersAndGroups02On the New blade, select the Users and groups assignment to open the Users and groups blade. On the Users and groups blade, select All users and click Done;
4 AAD_CA_CloudApps02On the New blade, select the Cloud apps assignment to open the Cloud apps blade. On the Cloud apps blade, select All cloud apps and click Done;
5 AAD_CA_ClientApps02On the New blade, select the Conditions assignment to open the Conditions blade. On the Conditions blade, select Client apps (preview) to open the Client apps (preview) blade. On the Client apps (preview) blade, click Yes with Configure, select Mobile apps and desktop clients > Other clients and click Done and Done;
6

AAD_CA_Grant02On the New blade, select the Grant access control to open the Grant blade. On the Grant blade, select Block access and click Select.

Note: Make sure that there are no apps within the environment that still need basic authentication, as this configuration will block all of it.

7 Open the New blade, select On with Enable policy and click Create;

Note: It can take up to 24 hours for the policy to take effect.

End-user experience

One of the best use cases is an old Office version. Office 2010 and the default configuration of Office 2013, both use basic authentication. Office 2016 and later use modern authentication by default. Due to the way basic authentication works the end-user experience is not pretty and will not be pretty. Below is an example of the end-user experience when using Outlook 2010 for connection to Exchange Online. As mentioned, it’s effective and not pretty.

BlockOutlook

More information

For more information about conditional access and device state, please refer to this article about Conditions in Azure Active Directory conditional access | Client apps.

Join us at Experts Live Netherlands in Ede

A bit more than a week from now, June 19, Experts Live Netherlands will be in Ede. Experts Live Netherlands is the biggest Microsoft community event of the BeNeLux, with over a 1000 visitors. Together with my finest colleague, Arjan Vroege, I will deliver a session about your ultimate hybrid workplace. And we hope to see you there!

EL_social_tempate_speakers_Arjan

About our session

During this session we will take you into the world of the hybrid workplace. The modern workplace is a great story, for cloud only organizations, but the reality is often that there are a lot of components still on-premises. During this session we will touch the different delegate subjects from identity until apps and from management until connectivity. That means, a lot of ground to cover and a lot of choices to be made. Besides that we will have a couple of cool demos, here is a small list with a sneak preview of subjects that will be part of our session:  Pass-through authentication, Co-management, MSIX and Azure AD Application Proxy. Make sure that you don’t miss this!

Additional giveaway

As my employer, KPN ICT Consulting, is one of the Gold Partners of Experts Live Netherlands 2018, we also have a partner session. During that sessions my colleagues, Arjan Vroege and Nicolien Warnars, will explain how we internally migrated to a Microsoft 365 workplace for over 12.000 users. Very interesting for organizations that are looking for a great reference case.

Conditional access and device state

This week back in conditional access again. More specifically, the recently introduced feature to exclude devices based on the device state, which is currently still in preview. This enables organizations to exclude managed devices (Hybrid Azure AD joined and/ or compliant) from a conditional access policy. That means that the conditional access policy will only be applicable to unmanaged devices. This enables new scenarios and makes existing scenarios easier. Think about using session controls to enable a limited experience within cloud apps, for unmanaged devices only. In this post I’ll show the very simply and straight forward configuration, followed by the end-user experience.

Configuration

The configurations that make the most sense for using the device state are related to the access controls. At least, in my opinion. All other scenario’s can also be created by using the already available options. It just makes it a bit easier. By looking at the access controls, the session related controls are the most obvious configuration to start with. The Use app enforced restrictions session control enables organizations to enable a limited experience within a cloud app, for, in this case, unmanaged devices and the Use proxy enforced restrictions session control enables organizations to sent the user sign-in information to Microsoft Cloud App Security, also for, in this case, unmanaged devices. That enables additional actions based on the users sign-in activity. The following seven steps walk through the simple configuration to create a conditional access policy that uses the proxy enforced restriction session control.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Conditional access > Policies or to Azure Active Directory > Conditional access > Policies;
2 On the Policies blade, click New policy to open the New blade;
3 AAD_CA_UsersAndGroups01On the New blade, select the Users and groups assignment to open the Users and groups blade. On the Users and groups blade, select All users and click Done;
4 AAD_CA_CloudApps01On the New blade, select the Cloud apps assignment to open the Cloud apps blade. On the Cloud apps blade, select All cloud apps and click Done;
5

AAD_CA_DeviceState01On the New blade, select the Conditions assignment to open the Conditions blade. On the Conditions blade, select Device state (preview) to open the Device state (preview) blade. On the Device state (preview) blade, click Yes with Configure, click Exclude, select Device Hybrid Azure AD joined and Device marked as compliant and click Done and Done;

Note: Think about the easier scenarios that can be created by using the option to exclude domain joined devices from the conditional access policy.

6

AAD_CA_Session01On the New blade, select the Session access control to open the Session blade. On the Session blade, select Use proxy enforced restrictions (preview) and click Select.

Note: Optionally configure additional a Cloud App Security Access policy or Cloud App Security Session policy to enable additional behavior based on the sign-in information of the user. For example, block the sign-in for a specific cloud app.

7 Open the New blade, select On with Enable policy and click Create;

Note: Basically the Azure AD conditional access policy and the Conditional Access App Control access or session policy will work together to perform real-time monitoring and control.

End-user experience

Let’s end this post with the end-user experience, followed with the administrator experience. As I only have connectors for Office 365 and Microsoft Azure in my Cloud App Security, I can only create access policies for the connected apps. These access policies can be used to simply monitor the activity or to actually block the session and display a custom block message. Besides that, the policy can also create alerts. In the dashboard, via email and via text message.

I created a policy that would block the session of the end-user with a custom message as shown below. Yes, I could have blocked the session already with conditional access itself, but this provides me with some more information about the sign-in.

CloudAppSecurity_Blocked01

When I’m now looking in the Cloud App Security dashboard, I can already see the alerts. When I navigate to either Investigate > Activity log or Alerts, I can look at the information as shown below. That provides me with the source, which, in this case. is Azure AD conditional access, the matched policy and information about the user and the device (as shown below). Pretty nice.

AppDashboard01

More information

For more information about conditional access and device state, please refer to this article about Conditions in Azure Active Directory conditional access | Device state.