Automagically convert Intune managed devices to AutoPilot

Tweet-AutoPilotThis week a short blog post about my tweet of a bit more than a week ago. In that tweet I mentioned a new easy method to automagically convert Intune managed devices to AutoPilot. That method makes some scenarios a whole lot easier. Like for example what I did in this post to get the AutoPilot device information of Intune managed devices. That type of custom scripting is not needed anymore!

As I got many reactions to that tweet, mainly related to the location of that configuration, I thought it would be good to make a short post describing the configuration option and the expected behavior. In this post I’ll provide the steps to make this configuration and I’ll describe the expected behavior. There is no real end-user or administrator experience to show for this configuration. So, no section related to that. I’ll do explain the the expected behavior in the introduction.

Introduction

Let’s start with a short introduction about the mentioned configuration option. That configuration option is the Convert all targeted devices to AutoPilot setting. By default an AutoPilot deployment profile is only applied to already existing AutoPilot devices and doesn’t apply to non-AutoPilot devices. Configuring the Convert all targeted devices to AutoPilot setting to Yes will automagically convert all devices in the assigned group to AutoPilot. This is a one-time conversion that also works for co-managed devices. That also means that removing the AutoPilot profile will not remove the converted devices from AutoPilot. After conversion the devices can only be removed by using the Windows AutoPilot devices view. Keep in mind that it can take up to 48 hours for the conversion to be completed.

Configuration

Now let’s continue by having a look at the actual configuration. And in this case only the specific Convert all targeted devices to AutoPilot setting. The following four steps walk through the steps to get to the specific setting and are not meant to create a complete the Windows AutoPilot deployment profiles.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune > Device enrollment > Windows enrollment to open the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade;
2 On the Device enrollment – Windows enrollment blade, select Deployment Profiles in the Windows AutoPilot Deployment Program section to open the Windows AutoPilot deployment profiles blade;
3 On Windows AutoPilot deployment profiles blade, either select Create profile or select [existing deployment profile] > Properties to open the Create profile blade or the [existing deployment profile] – Properties  blade;
4 On the Create profile blade or the [existing deployment profile] – Properties  blade, the setting Convert all targeted devices to AutoPilot must be switched to Yes (below is an example of the the [existing deployment profile] – Properties  blade, the Create profile blade looks similar) ;
MSIS-AutoPilot-Target

Note: There’s not a real easy method to see which devices are converted to AutoPilot. Those devices will show as any other imported device, without enrollment state. However, as the configuration is done via an AutoPilot deployment profile, the device is immediately assigned to a profile. Again, without creating any fancy configurations, like query based dynamic device groups.

More information

For more information about enrolling Windows devices by using Windows AutoPilot, please refer to the documentation named Enroll Windows devices by using the Windows Autopilot.

Join us at Experts Live Europe in Prague

b-B6v-rUA bit less than two weeks from now, October 25-26, Experts Live Europe will be in Prague. Together with my finest colleague, Arjan Vroege, I will deliver two sessions! And we hope to see you there!

Experts Live Europe is a Microsoft community conference with a focus on Microsoft cloud, datacenter and workplace management. During this conference, top experts from around the world present discussion panels, ask-the-experts sessions and breakout sessions and cover the latest products, technologies and solutions.

About our sessions

The maybe-not-that-sexy version of modern management – A true story –

In this session, we will take you into the real world of modern management. Modern management is a great buzzword and by now we all know the lovely story of modern management. We all know how it should work, but we often lack the real-world examples of organizations using modern management. During this session, we will show you how we internally deployed Windows 10 with Azure AD join and Intune management for over 10k devices. What choices did we make? Which challenges did we run into? Did we close all the gaps? We’ll try to answer these question. To conclude will also look at the available options right now and how they could have helped us. We will also have a couple of cool demos. To provide a sneak preview, here is a small list with subjects that will be part of our session: Win32 apps, MSIX and Windows AutoPilot.

Thursday Friday 2:40 PM – 3.40 PM

Create your ultimate hybrid workplace, what options do you have?

During this session we will take you into the world of the hybrid workplace. The modern workplace is a great story, for cloud only organizations, but the reality is often that there are a lot of components still on-premises. During this session we will touch the different delegate subjects from identity until apps and from management until connectivity. That means, a lot of ground to cover and a lot of choices to be made. Besides that we will have a couple of cool demos, here is a small list with a sneak preview of subjects that will be part of our session:  Pass-through authentication, Co-management, Win32 apps, MSIX and Azure AD Application Proxy.

Friday 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Make sure that you don’t miss these sessions!

Quick tip: Location services required for enhanced jailbreak detection

This week a short blog post about an end-user experience that might be slightly unexpected when using an iOS device. That experience is the “Turn on location services” compliance message in the Company Portal app. That message is caused by the Enhanced jailbreak detection compliance policy setting, as  that setting uses the location services of the iOS device for the enhanced detection, In this post I’ll first show the mentioned end-user experience, as that’s the trigger for this post, followed by the configuration that triggers the experience.

End-user experience

Let’s start this time by looking at the end-user experience. The user will notice that the iOS device is non-complaint and after opening the Company Portal app, the user will get the message “Turn on location services” (as shown below). That message also includes the required steps to eventually enable the location services on the iOS device;

20181003_171841643_iOS

Configuration

Now let’s have a look at the configuration that triggers the mentioned end-user experience. That configuration is not part of an actual compliance policy, but is part of the overall compliance policy settings. The compliance policy settings basically describes the default behavior for compliance policies. The two steps below show how to configure the Enhanced jailbreak detection setting.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Device compliance > Compliance policy settings to open the Device compliance – Compliance policy settings blade;;
2 On the Device compliance – Compliance policy settings blade, select Enabled with Enhanced jailbreak detection and click Save;
MSI-DeviceCompliancePolicySettings

Note: Keep in mind that enabling this setting impacts the battery usage of iOS devices and causes iOS devices to check-in more frequently with Microsoft Intune.

More information

For more information about compliance policy settings, please refer to the documentation about Get started with device compliance policies in Intune – Ways to deploy device compliance policies.

Deploy customized Win32 apps via Microsoft Intune

Last week Microsoft announced the ability to deploy Win32 apps via Microsoft Intune during Microsoft Ignite. That takes away one of the biggest challenges when looking at modern management and Microsoft Intune. I know that I’m not the first to blog about this subject, but I do think that this subject demands a spot on my blog. Besides that, I’ll show in this post that the configuration looks a lot like deploying apps via ConfigMgr. Not just from the perspective of the configuration options, but also from the perspective of the configuration challenges when the installation contains multiple files. In this post I’ll show the configuration steps, followed by the end-user experience, when deploying a customized Adobe Reader DC app (including the latest patch).

Pre-process Win32 app

The first step in deploying Win32 apps via Microsoft Intune is using the Microsoft Intune Win32 App Packaging Tool to pre-process Win32 apps. Wrap the Win32 app. The packaging tool wraps the application installation files into the .intunewin format. Also, the packaging tool detects the parameters required by Intune to determine the application installation state.  After using this tool on apps, it will be possible to upload and assign the apps in the Microsoft Intune console. The following six steps walk through wrapping the Adobe Reader DC app, including some customizations and the latest patch.

1 Download the Microsoft Intune Win32 App Packaging Tool. In my example C:\Temp;
2 Create a folder that contains the Adobe Reader DC installation files (including the latest MSP and the MST that contains the customizations). In my example C:\Temp\AdobeReader;
3 Create an installation file that contains the complete installation command and place that file in the directory with the installation files. In my example I created an Install.cmd in C:\Temp\AdobeReader that contains msiexec /i “%~dp0AcroRead.msi” TRANSFORMS=”%~dp0AcroRead.mst” /Update “%~dp0AcroRdrDCUpd1801120063.msp” /qn /L*v c:\InstallReader.log ;
MSI-Win32-Explorer
Note: This method is similar to an easy method in the ConfigMgr world to make sure that the installation process would look at the right location for the additional files.
4 Open a Command Prompt as Administrator and navigate to the location of IntuneWinAppUtil.exe. In my example that means cd \Temp;
5 Run IntuneWinAppUtil.exe and provide the following information, when requested

  • Please specify the source folder: C:\Temp\AdobeReader;
  • Please specify the setup file: AcroRead.msi;
  • Please specify the output folder: C:\Temp
MSI-IWAU-start
Note: Even though I will use a command file to trigger the installation, it’s important to specify the MSI as setup file. That will make sure that, during the configuration in Microsoft Intune, the information will be preconfigured based on the information of the MSI.
6 Once the wrapping is done. The message Done!!! will be shown. In my example a file named AcroRead.intunewin will be created in C:\Temp.
MSI-IWAU-end

Note: It’s possible to use something like 7-Zip to open the created AcroRead.intunewin file. Besides content, that file contains a Detection.xml file that shows the detected information of the installation file.

Configure Win32 app

Now let’s continue by looking at the actual configuration steps, within Microsoft Intune, to configure the Win32 app. The following 17 steps walk through all the steps to configure the Win32 app, by using the .intunewin file. After configuring the app, make sure to assign the app to a user group.

1 Open the Azure portal and navigate to Intune > Client apps > Apps to open the Client apps – Apps blade;
2 On the Client apps – Apps blade, click Add to open the Add app blade;
3 On the Add app blade, select Windows app (Win32) – preview to show the configuration options and select App package file to open the App package file blade.
4 MSI-Win32-AppPackageFileOn the App package file blade, select the created AcroRead.intunewin as App package file and click OK to return to the Add app blade;
5 Back on the Add app blade, select App information to open the App information blade;
6

MSI-Win32-AppInformationOn the App information blade, provide at least the following information and click OK to return to the Add app blade;

  • Name: Adobe Acrobat Reader DC is pre-provisioned as name of the app;
  • Description: Provide a description of the app;
  • Publisher: Provide the publisher of the app;

Note: The remaining information regarding the Information URL, the Privacy URL, the Developer, the Owner, the Notes and the Logo is optional.

7 Back on the Add app blade, select Program to open the Program blade;
8 MSI-Win32-ProgramOn the Program blade, change the Install command to “Install.cmd”, verify the Uninstall command and click OK to return to the Add app blade;
9 Back on the Add app blade, select Requirements to open the Requirements blade;
10

MSI-Win32-RequirementsOn the Requirements blade, provide at least the following information and click OK to return to the Add app blade;

  • Operating system architecture: Select the applicable platforms;
  • Minimum operating system: Select a minimum operating system version;
11 Back on the Add app blade, select Detection rules to open the Detection rules blade;
12 On the Detection rules blade, select Manually configure detection rules and click Add to open the Detection rule blade.
13 MSI-Win32-DetectionRuleOn the Detection rule blade, select MSI as Rule type, verify the pre-provisioned MSI product code and click OK to return to the Detection rules blade;
14 Back on the Detection rules blade, click OK to return to the Add app blade;
15 Back on the Add app blade, select Return codes to open the Return codes blade;
16 MSI-Win32-ReturnCodesOn the Return codes blade, verify the preconfigured return codes and click OK to return to the Add app blade;
17 Back on the Add app blade, click Add to actually add app.

Note: The Intune Management Extension will be used for installing the Win32 app. That also means that the process regarding detection, download and installation, of the Win32 app, can be followed in the IntuneManagementExtension.log file.

End-user experience

Let’s end this post by looking at the end-user experience. The user will receive a notification that changes are required, followed by a notification that a download is in progress, followed by a notification about a successful installation. All three stages are shown below. After the last message, the Start Screen shows the newly installed Adobe Reader DC app. Also, in this case, the Desktop doesn’t show the default desktop icon, which I removed using the customization file (MST).

MSI-AAR-Desktop

More information

For more information about the Microsoft Intune Win32 App Packaging Tool, please refer to the GitHub location here.