Managing local policies security options for accounts via Windows 10 MDM

This blog post uses the LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions area of the Policy configuration service provider (CSP) to manage local policies security options on Windows 10 devices. This area was added in Windows 10, version 1709, which is currently available as Insider Preview build.

This week a blog post about managing local policies security options via Windows 10 MDM. More specifically, local policies security options settings related to accounts. For example, to block the usage of Microsoft accounts. I might address the other areas of the local policies security options in later blog posts, but that will be more of the same. The ability to manage local policies security options is something new in Windows 10 MDM. Windows 10, version 1709, introduces the LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions area in the Policy CSP. In this post I’ll look at the available settings in the Policy CSP and I’ll provide information about how those settings related to actual local policies security options. I’ll also provide some configuration guidelines for Microsoft Intune hybrid and Microsoft Intune standalone and I’ll end this post with the some examples of the actual device configuration.

Available settings

Now let’s start by having a look at the available settings. Windows 10, version 1709, introduces the LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions area in the Policy CSP. That area contains 20+ settings. Those settings are related to accounts, interactive logon, network security, recovery console, shutdown and user account control. In this post I’m specifically looking at the settings related to accounts. The table below show the available settings related to accounts and the available values.

Setting Value Description
Accounts_BlockMicrosoftAccounts 0 – Disabled
1 – Enabled
This setting allows the administrator to prevent users from adding new Microsoft accounts on this computer.
Accounts_EnableAdministratorAccountStatus 0 – Disabled
1 – Enabled
This setting allows the administrator to enable the local Administrator account.
Accounts_EnableGuestAccountStatus 0 – Disabled
1 – Enabled
This setting allows the administrator to enable the Guest account.
Accounts_LimitLocalAccountUseOfBlank PasswordsToConsoleLogonOnly 0 – Disabled
1 – Enabled
This setting allows the administrator to configure whether local accounts that are not password protected can be used to log on from locations other than the physical computer console.
Accounts_RenameAdministratorAccount <string> This setting allows the administrator to configure whether a different account name is associated with the security identifier (SID) for the account Administrator.
Accounts_RenameGuestAccount <string> This setting allows the administrator to configure whether a different account name is associated with the security identifier (SID) for the account Guest.

Local group policy setting

The nice thing is that the mentioned account related settings, in the LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions area of the Policy CSP (./Vendor/MSFT/Policy/Config), are all related to actual local group policy settings. Those settings can be found at Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options. The name of the area, in the Policy CSP, simply translates to the location in the local group policies. Nice and easy. The table below shows how the available settings, related to accounts, actually translate to local group policy settings.

Local group policy setting Policy CSP
Accounts: Block Microsoft accounts Accounts_BlockMicrosoftAccounts
Accounts: Administrator account status Accounts_EnableAdministratorAccountStatus
Accounts: Guest account status Accounts_EnableGuestAccountStatus
Accounts: Limit local account use of blank password to console logon only Accounts_LimitLocalAccountUseOfBlank PasswordsToConsoleLogonOnly
Accounts: Rename administrator account Accounts_RenameAdministratorAccount
Accounts: Rename guest account Accounts_RenameGuestAccount

Configure settings

After getting to know the available settings, let’s have a closer look at the configuration of the settings. The settings can be used in Microsoft Intune hybrid and Microsoft Intune standalone, by using the configuration guidelines shown below.

Environment Configuration guidelines
Microsoft Intune hybrid

IntuneH_BlockMSAccount The configuration in Microsoft Intune hybrid can be performed by starting the Create Configuration Item Wizard in the Configuration Manager administration console. Make sure to select Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 (below Settings for devices managed without the Configuration Manager client) on the General page and to select Windows 10 on the Supported Platforms page. Now select Configure additional settings that are not in the default setting groups on the Device Settings page and the configuration can begin by using the earlier mentioned OMA-URI settings and values.

Once the configurations are finished, the created configuration items can be added to a configuration baseline and can be deployed to Windows 10 devices/ users.

Microsoft Intune standalone (Azure portal)

IntuneS_BlockMSAccountThe configuration in Microsoft Intune standalone, in the Azure portal, can be performed by creating a Device configuration. Create a new profile and within the new profile, make sure to select Windows 10 and later as Platform and Custom as Profile type. In the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade, add the custom settings by using the earlier mentioned OMA-URI settings and values.

Once the configurations are finished, the profile can be saved and can be deployed to Windows 10 devices/ users.

Note: This post is based on the custom OMA-URI settings configuration. At some point in time this configuration can become available via the UI of Microsoft Intune standalone and/or hybrid.

Device configuration

Usually I’ll end these type of posts with the end-user experience. However, in this case it’s better to simply look at the device configuration instead. On the left is an export of the MDM Diagnostics Information, which clearly shows the default configuration and the new configurations via MDM. On the right is an overview of the Local Group Policy Editor, which clearly shows the new actual configuration of the new configuration via MDM.

MDMDiagReport_Settings LGPO_Settings

More information

For more information about the LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions area of the Policy CSP, please refer to this article about Policy CSP – LocalPoliciesSecurityOptions.

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