Conditional Access for PCs – Part II: SharePoint Online

Last week I started with this series of blog posts about conditional access for PCs. I started with the requirements for conditional access for PCs. This week, in the second part of this blog series, I’ll build onto those requirements by adding the SharePoint Online Policy and the Compliance Policy. After those configurations are in place, I’ll finish, this second part of this blog series, with the end-user experience.

Note: This post shows a few identical configurations as I also mention in the third part of this blog series. This allows one to configure the SharePoint Online Policy without going through the configuration of the Exchange Online Policy.

Configuration

The configuration of conditional access for PCs contains two actions. The first action is to configure the SharePoint Online Policy and the second action is to configure the Compliance Policy.

SharePoint Online Policy

Now let’s start with the first action, which is the configuration of the SharePoint Online Policy. This policy is used to manage access to OneDrive for Business files located on SharePoint Online, based on the configured conditions.

The configuration of the SharePoint Online Policy is the same for both Microsoft Intune standalone and Microsoft Intune hybrid. The road to the setting might differ, but, in the end, the configuration has to be performed from the Microsoft Intune administration console.

Environment Configuration
Microsoft Intune standalone and Microsoft Intune hybrid

SharePoint_Online_PolicyIn the Microsoft Intune administration console navigate to Policy > Conditional Access > SharePoint Online Policy;

To enable the SharePoint Online Policy for PCs select at least Enable conditional access policy for SharePoint Online and Windows devices must meet the following requirements and choose, based on the requirements, between Devices must be compliant, Devices must be domain joined or Devices must be domain joined or compliant.

To make sure that the SharePoint Online Policy is targeted to users, configure a security group as a Targeted Group and, when there are users that need to be exempted, make sure to configure a security group as an Exempted Group. After saving the policy, it takes effect immediately.

Note: For testing the end-user experience I’ve tested the SharePoint Online Policy with all three possible configurations for Windows devices.

Compliancy Policy

The next action is the configuration of the Compliance Policy. This policy defines the rules and settings that a device must comply with in order to be considered compliant by conditional access polices. A good thing to keep in mind is that it’s not required to configure and deploy a Compliance Policy. When no Compliance Policy is configured and deployed, the device will automatically be considered compliant.

The configuration of the Compliance Policy differs between Microsoft Intune standalone and Microsoft Intune hybrid.

Environment Configuration
Microsof Intune standalone

Compliance_Policy_IntuneIn the Microsoft Intune administration console navigate to Policy > Conditional Access > Compliance Policies and click Add….

To configure a Compliance Policy for PCs, choose, based on the requirements, between the applicable Password and Encryption settings.

Microsoft Intune hybrid

Compliance_Policy_ConfigMgrIn the Configuration Manager administration console navigate to Assets and Compliance > Overview > Compliance Settings > Compliance Policies and click Create Compliance Policy.

To configure a Compliance Policy for PCs, choose, based on the requirements, during the Create Compliance Policy Wizard the Supported Platforms and choose between the applicable Password and Encryption Rules.

Note: If only a Windows desktop platform is selected as a Supported Platform, only the Minimum password length Rule Type will be possible, while the File encryption on mobile device Rule Type also seems to be applicable.

Note: It’s possible to create multiple Compliance Policies for different devices, or different scenarios. After creating the different policies, don’t forget to the deploy the policies to users, or computers.

End-user experience

After the complete configuration is done, it’s time to look at the end-user experience for the most common used Office applications. In this case I’m talking about the end-user experience of a blocked user, as the end-user experience of an allowed user doesn’t differ from any other Office experience.

When the end-users’ device is not compliant, or not joined to the domain, the end-user can get the messages as shown below when the end-user is trying to access files on SharePoint Online. The not compliant message will also show when the combined option is configured. The examples are shown for Word 2013, Excel 2013 and PowerPoint 2013. In that order.

Initial Not compliant Not domain joined
Word2013_SignIn Word2013_Security Word2013_Domain
Excel2013_SignIn Excel2013_Security Excel2013_Domain
PowerPoint2013_SignIn PowerPoint2013_Security PowerPoint2013_Domain

Note: At this moment this works perfect for Office 2013. However, with Office 2016 I’m still experiencing some weird behavior with multiple apps, like Word 2016 and PowerPoint 2016. To be continued.

More information

For more information about the SharePoint Online Policy and the Compliance Policy, that are used for conditional access for PCs, please refer to the following links:

Conditional Access for PCs – Part I: Requirements

Another new capability that’s added, during the August 2015 update, to Microsoft Intune, is conditional access for PCs that run Office desktop applications to access Exchange Online and SharePoint Online. This nice capability enables us to require that PCs must be either domain joined or compliant. In order to be compliant, the PCs must be enrolled in Microsoft Intune and the PCs must comply with the policies.

This capability has more requirements and requires more configurations than the most other Microsoft Intune standalone or Microsoft Intune hybrid capabilities. That’s why I decided to make this another blog series. This blog series will contain three parts:

  1. Requirements – This part will list all the requirements and the required configurations to start with the different conditional access scenarios;
  2. SharePoint Online – This part will show the configuration of conditional access for SharePoint Online, including the end-user experience;
  3. Exchange Online – This part will show the configuration of conditional access for Exchange Online, including the end-user experience.

Requirements

Now let’s start with the requirements for conditional access for PCs. The number of requirements depends on the used scenario. The most complicated scenario, of using on-premises ADFS and using being domain joined as the conditional access check, requires all of the following requirements.

Requirement 1 – Operating System

The first requirement, is the easiest the requirement, as it simply requires a specific operating system level. To use conditional access for PCs, Windows 7.0 or later is required.

Requirement 2 – Enable modern authentication in Office

The second requirement is still not really challenging, but it contains two important requirements. To use conditional access for PCs, the Office installation must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Office 2013 is used, including the March 2015 update or later, and modern authentication is enabled. To enable modern authentication, make sure that the following registry keys are set:

    Registry key Type Value
    HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Common\Identity\EnableADAL REG_DWORD 1
    HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Common\Identity\Version REG_DWORD 1
  • Office 2016 is used;

Requirement 3 – Automatically register device in Azure AD

The third requirement is already more challenging, because it contains multiple configurations that need to be in place. To use conditional access for PCs, a domain joined device needs to be automatically registered in Azure AD. This requires the following three configurations.

Configure an additional Azure AD relying part trust claim rule

  • Open the AD FS Management console;
  • Navigate to AD FS > Trust Relationships
    > Relying Part Trusts;
  • Right-click the Microsoft Office 365 Identity Platform
    trust and select Edit Claim Rules…;
  • Navigate to Issuance Transform Rules and click
    Add Rule… to open the Add Transform Claim
    Rule Wizard
    ;
  • On the Choose Rule Type page, select Send Claims
    Using a Custom Rule
    and click Next;
  • On the Choose Claim Rule page, specify a Claim rule
    name
    , provide the following Claim rule and click
    Finish.
  • c:[Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/claims/authnmethodsreferences”]
    => issue(claim = c);

Configure an additional Azure AD relying part trust authentication class

  • Open Windows PowerShell and run the following command;
    Set-AdfsRelyingPartyTrust ` -TargetName "Microsoft Office 365 Identity Platform" ` -AllowedAuthenticationClassReferences wiaormultiauthn

Configure automatic device registration

  • Windows 7 is used and automatic workplace joined is enabled. To enable automatic workplace join, on Windows 7, install the following software package: https://connect.microsoft.com/site1164;
  • Windows 8.1 and later is used and automatic workplace join is enabled. To enable automatic workplace join, on Windows 8.1, make sure that a GPO, like the following, is configured and linked:
    • Open the Group Policy Management console;
    • Navigate to Group Policy Management > Forest:<TheForest> > Domains > <TheDomain>;
    • Right-click Group Policy Objects and select New.
    • Provide a Name and click OK;
    • Right-click the new Group Policy Object and select Edit;
    • Navigate to Computer Configuration > Policies > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Workplace Join;
    • Right-click the Automatically workplace join client computers setting and select Edit;
    • Select Enabled and click OK.

Note: There are also required configurations for the ADFS Global Authentication Policy, Internet Explorer and the network connectivity, but those are all considered default.

Requirement 4 – Block non-modern authentication protocols in AD FS

The fourth requirement is the most challenging, at least for me. To use conditional access for PCs, non-modern authentication protocols should be blocked to Office 365. Basically, everything except ActiveSync and browser-based logins should be blocked. A good thing to keep in mind, in this case, is that Outlook uses MAPI/HTTP to connect to Office 365. This can be achieved by making sure that a configuration like the following example is in place (other examples can be found in the linked articles):

  • Open the AD FS Management console;
  • Navigate to AD FS > Trust Relationships > Relying Part Trusts;
  • Right-click the Microsoft Office 365 Identity Platform trust and select
    Edit Claim Rules…;
  • Navigate to Issuance Authorization Rules and click Add Rule… to open the Add Issuance Authorization Claim Rule Wizard;
  • On the Choose Rule Type page, select Send Claims Using a Custom Rule and click Next.
  • On the Choose Claim Rule page, specify a Claim rule name, provide the following Claim rule and click Finish.
  • exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-proxy”])
    && NOT exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-client-application”,
    Value == “Microsoft.Exchange.Autodiscover”])
    && NOT exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-client-application”,
    Value == “Microsoft.Exchange.ActiveSync”])
    && NOT exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-client-application”,
    Value == “Microsoft.Exchange.Mapi”])
    && NOT exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-client-application”,
    Value == “Microsoft.Exchange.Nspi”])
    && NOT exists([Type == “http://schemas.microsoft.com/2012/01/requestcontext/claims/x-ms-endpoint-absolute-path”,
    Value == “/adfs/ls/”])
    => issue(Type = “http://schemas.microsoft.com/authorization/claims/deny”, Value = “true”);

  • Verify that this new claim rule is created below the default Permit Access to All Users claim rule.

Note: This example claim rule blocks all the traffic through the proxy unless the context is auto discover, ActiveSync, Mapi, Nspi or a browser.

More information

For more information about the requirements for conditional access for PCs, please refer to the following links:

Multi-identity in the managed Outlook app – Part 2

This blog post will show the behavior of the multi identities in the Microsoft Outlook app, as described in my posts about multi-identity in the managed Outlook app – part 1 and the Microsoft Intune Managed Browser. I’ve made four small movies that will show the behavior of the Microsoft Outlook app. A general note with these movies is that they’ll start to blink and act all funny at the moments that a managed app is opened, or a when a PIN is required.

Part I – Install and configure the Microsoft Outlook app

In this first part I’ll show how the Microsoft Outlook app behaves during the installation and initial configuration. During this movie I’ll go through the following actions:

  • Open the Company Portal app;
  • Install the Microsoft Outlook app;
  • Open the Microsoft Outlook app;
  • Configure the PIN.

Part II – Open URLs in the Microsoft Outlook app

In this second part I’ll show how the Microsoft Outlook app behaves with opening URLs. During this movie I’ll go through the following actions:

  • Open the Microsoft Outlook app;
  • Open a blocked URL from company email;
  • Open an allowed URL from company email;
  • Open an URL from personal email.

Part III – Copy and paste content in the Microsoft Outlook app

In this third part I’ll show how the Microsoft Outlook app behaves with copying and pasting content to different apps. During this movie I’ll go through the following actions:

  • Open the Microsoft Outlook app;
  • Copy content from company email;
  • Paste the content in an unmanaged app;
  • Paste the content in a managed app;
  • Copy content from personal email;
  • Paste the content in any app.

Part IV – Open and save attachments in the Microsoft Outlook app

In this fourth part I’ll show how the Microsoft Outlook app behaves with saving attachments. During this movie I’ll go through the following actions:

  • Open the Microsoft Outlook app;
  • Open an attachment from company email;
  • Save the attachment;
  • Open an attachment from personal email;
  • Save the attachment.

Multi-identity in the managed Outlook app – Part 1

Microsoft_OutlookThis blog post can be seen as a follow up about a previous post about the email profile behavior after retiring a mobile device. During that post I showed the behavior of email profiles in the native mail app and the Outlook app after retiring the mobile device. In this post I’ll dive deeper into the Outlook app. More specifically, the behavior of the managed Outlook app and multi-identities. To be complete, I’ll divide this blog post in two parts. This first part will describe the assumptions, the configuration and the behavior and the second part will show the behavior in a real example.

Assumptions

During this blog post I’ve done four important assumption, about the used environment, that might impact the test results. When these four items are not in place, the results might differ from the results in this blog post. The key is that these four items create a fully managed Outlook app for company email.

  1. Office 365, including Exchange Online, is in place for the company email;
  2. Microsoft Intune hybrid, or standalone, is in place for managing the mobile devices;
  3. Conditional access is used to provide access to the company email;
  4. Application management policies are in place to protect the company email.

Configuration

During this blog post I’ve used the configuration, for the managed Outlook app, as shown in the pictures below. These pictures are taken from a Microsoft Intune hybrid environment, but the settings that can be configured are identical to the settings that can be configured in a Microsoft Intune standalone environment.

iOS Android
iOS_AppManagementPolicy Android_AppManagementPolicy

Behavior

One key takeaway about the behavior is a difference in the behavior of the Outlook app for iOS and the Outlook app for Android.

If a PIN requirement is configured, the Outlook app for iOS will always prompt for a PIN.

It will even prompt for a PIN during the initial startup. On the other hand, if a PIN requirement is configured, the Outlook app for Android will only prompt for a PIN after a company email profile is configured.

Besides that key difference the behavior of the Outlook app for iOS and the Outlook app for Android will be identical. Based on the configured managed application policy the end-user will experience the following behavior.

Setting Company email Personal email
Restrict web content to display in the Managed Browser

The end-user will experience that an URL will open in the Managed Browser.

Note: When the Managed Browser is used with an allow list, the URL has to be part of that list.

The end-user will experience that an URL will open in the default browser.
Prevent Android backups (Android only)1 The end-user will not experience anything special. The end-user will not experience anything special.
Prevent iTunes and iCloud backups (iOS only)1 The end-user will not experience anything special. The end-user will not experience anything special.
Allow app to transfer data to other apps The end-user will experience that data can only be transferred to other managed apps. The end-user will experience that data can be transferred to any other apps.
Allow app to receive data from other apps The end-user will experience that data can be received from all other apps. The end-user will experience that data can be received from all other apps.
Prevent “Save As The end-user will experience that the “Save As” option is missing for attachments. The end-user will experience that the “Save As” option is available for attachments.
Restrict cut, copy, and paste with other apps The end-user will experience that content and attachments can only be copied and pasted to other managed apps. The end-user will experience that content and attachments can be copied and pasted to all other apps.
Require simple PIN for access (including number of attempts before PIN reset) The end-user will experience that a PIN is required for access.

iOS – The end-user will experience that a PIN is required for access.

Android – The end-user will experience that a PIN is not required for access.

Require corporate credentials for access The end-user will experience that corporate credentials are required for access.

iOS – The end-user will experience that corporate credentials are  required for access.

Android – The end-user will experience that corporate credentials are not required for access.

Require device compliance with corporate policy for access The end-user will experience that there is no access when the device is jailbroken (iOS) or rooted (Android). The end-user will experience that there is always access.
Recheck the access requirements after timeout and offline grace period3 The end-user will not experience anything special. The end-user will not experience anything special.
Encrypt app data4 The end-user will not experience anything special. The end-user will not experience anything special.
Block screen capture(Android only) The end-user will experience that the screen capture option can’t be used. The end-user will experience that the screen capture option can be used.

1 This setting would make sure that the backup of the Outlook app is disabled, but, by default, the Outlook app already doesn’t perform online backups.
2 This setting will make sure that the access requirements for the Outlook app are checked again after the specified timeout and grace period.
3 This setting will make sure that all data associated with the Outlook app will be encrypted. On iOS the data is encrypted at rest using the device level encryption of iOS and on Android the data is encrypted during file I/O operations via encryption provided by Microsoft.

More information

For more information about controlling managed apps, please refer to the following links:

Email profile behavior after retiring a mobile device

Microsoft_OutlookThis blog post will be a follow-up on my blog post of last week about the three layers of protection with conditional access for Exchange email. During that post I tried to stress the importance of protecting, and being in control of, company email. In this blog post I will go through different scenarios to show the behavior of company email after retiring a mobile device from Microsoft Intune. I will show the results of these scenarios for both the native email app and the Outlook app.

Scenarios

Before I start with the different scenarios it’s important to mention that, after a mobile device is successfully retired from Microsoft Intune, the user will be able to configure company email on its mobile device. This is due to a default cache on Exchange. It might take up to, somewhere between, 6 and 24 hours before Exchange will re-check the device. For more information about this, please refer to this forum discussion.

Scenario 1: Email profile and the native mail app

In this scenario the Email Profile that’s configured by Microsoft Intune, is used in the native mail app.

Result after retiring mobile device
1 The Email Profile for the native mail app is successfully removed

Scenario 2: Email profile, the native mail app and additional personal email account

In this scenario the Email Profile that’s configured by Microsoft Intune, is used in the native mail app. Besides that, an additional personal email account is manually configured in the native mail app.

Result after retiring mobile device
1 The Email Profile for the native mail app is successfully removed
2 The additional personal email account is still available in the native mail app

Scenario 3: Email profile, the native mail app and the Outlook app

In this scenario the Email Profile that’s configured by Microsoft Intune, is used in the native mail app. Besides that, the same company account is manually configured in the Outlook app.

Result after retiring mobile device
1 The Email Profile for the native mail app is successfully removed
2 The same company account is removed from the managed Outlook app.

Scenario 4: Email profile, the native mail app, the Outlook app and additional company account

In this scenario the Email Profile that’s configured by Microsoft Intune, is used in the native mail app. Besides that, the same company account and an additional company account are manually configured in the Outlook app.

Note: Via the default mail app it’s not possible to configure multiple company accounts. The default mail app will require enrollment of every company account that’s used for configuring company email.

Result after retiring mobile device
1 The Email Profile for the native mail app is successfully removed
2 The same company account is successfully removed from the Outlook app
3 The additional company account is still available in the Outlook app, but will require the device to be re-enrolled

Scenario 5: Email profile, the native mail app, the Outlook app and additional personal account

In this scenario the Email Profile that’s configured by Microsoft Intune, is used in the native mail app. Besides that, the same company account and an additional personal account are manually configured in the Outlook app.

Result after retiring mobile device
1 The Email Profile for the native mail app is successfully removed
2 The same company account is successfully removed from the Outlook app
3 The additional personal account is still available in the Outlook app

Conclusion

I probably could have created even more scenarios to test behavior of company email, after retiring a mobile device from Microsoft Intune, but, as the scenarios show, that I did test, the company email behaves exactly as expected. Basically I can summarize the results in two very simple, but very important, points:

1 The company email won’t be available after retiring the mobile device from Microsoft Intune
2 The personal email will be left untouched after retiring the mobile device from Microsoft Intune


Note
: Even though I state everywhere only Microsoft Intune, this behavior is applicable for Microsoft Intune standalone and Microsoft Intune hybrid.

The three layers of protection with conditional access for Exchange email

In this blog post I would like to write a little about, what I like to call, the three layers of protection with conditional access for Exchange email. No, I don’t mean that a device has to be 1) enrolled in Microsoft Intune, 2) workplace joined and 3) compliant with any Microsoft Intune compliance policies. What I do mean is related to company data, in this case company email, and the protection of it on mobile devices. That means three different layers of protection for Exchange email on mobile devices. From basic protection to almost complete protection.

The first layer of protection

ConditionalAccess_Level1The first, basic, layer of protection is simply using an Exchange Online Policy, or an Exchange On-premises Policy. These policies make it possible to protect Exchange email by blocking the access, via ActiveSync, to Exchange. It, of course, doesn’t block connections via OWA.

By enabling these policies, a mobile device, of an user that’s in a Targeted Group and not in an Exempted Group, will be blocked from ActiveSync when it’s not enrolled in Microsoft Intune, and/or not compliant with any targeted Microsoft Intune compliance policies. When no compliance policy is targeted, the device will automatically be evaluated as compliant. Also, not supported and exempted platforms can be blocked access through these policies.

I like to call this the first layer of protection, as it provides very basic protection, to the Exchange email, on the mobile device, by simply making sure that the mobile device is enrolled in Microsoft Intune. That enrollment makes sure that the connected mobile devices are known by the IT organization.

The second layer of protection

ConditionalAccess_Level2The second layer of protection is adding a few requirements, by using a Conditional Access Policy. A Conditional Access Policy can be used to add additional requirements to the mobile devices that want to connect to Exchange email, via ActiveSync.

These policies can be used to specify additional requirements to the password and encryption of the mobile device. Besides that it’s possible to, in case of iOS, block jailbroken mobile devices and, in case of Android, rooted mobile devices.

I like to call this the second layer of protection, as it already adds another form of protection, to the Exchange email, on the mobile device, by requiring additional configurations to mobile devices.

The third layer of protection

ConditionalAccess_Level3The third layer of protection is adding another, very important, requirement, by using a Conditional Access Policy in combination with an Email Profile.

This is basically nothing more than an additional configuration in the Conditional Access Policy, but it adds a lot more. It requires that the mobile device (currently only iOS) can only connect to Exchange email, via ActiveSync, when it’s using a specific Email Profile that’s configured via Microsoft Intune.

I like to call this the third layer of protection, as it adds almost complete protection to the company email that’s available on the mobile device. As the mobile device can only connect via an Email Profile, configured via Microsoft Intune, the company email will also be removed when the device is removed from Microsoft Intune.

Conclusion

These three layers of protection together make a very powerful combination for protecting company email. Especially by adding the third layer, it ensures that the available company email will also be removed again.

A good thing to know is that the (managed) Microsoft Outlook app can also still connect to Exchange email, via ActiveSync, as long as the mobile device is enrolled and compliant. More about this in my next blog post.

Note: Even though this post only shows Microsoft Intune standalone screenshots, the same is applicable to Microsoft Intune hybrid.

More information

For a lot more information about conditional access and compliance policies, please refer to the following links.